Friday, March 26, 2010

Pasadena's General Plan Debacle

On the City of Pasadena site dealing with their new General Plan process, the following paragraph can be found:

To date, community feedback has been clear: Pasadena's strong community character - its diversity, neighborhoods and small town feel - should be maintained; its history and heritage preserved; new development projects well-designed; traffic reduced; alternative modes of transportation encouraged; and economic vitality in commercial areas to be supported.

Now if you read between the lines of that happy talk you will discover that there is a lot more going on there than might first meet the eye. Pasadena is in the planning stages for their new General Plan, and the residents of the Rose City were invited to public meetings to share their perspectives and cares on the topic. However, what they told their solicitous City officials was apparently not really what they wanted to hear. Quite the contrary, those attending were quite unhappy over what has become of their City, and didn't want to see anymore of the kind of change they'd experienced since the now lamented previous General Plan came into being.

This from a November 27, 2009 Pasadena Star News article:

Planning process reveals Pasadena resident's distaste for high-density building - In the midst of a city planning process that will determine what Pasadena's future growth will look like, one thing certain has emerged: Residents are decidedly against high-density construction ... For the past 15 years, since the 1994 General Plan update, the city's development policies have focused on encouraging new growth in central Pasadena, along Colorado Boulevard, while keeping it away from neighborhoods ... But at recent community meetings on the General Plan update, some concerns have surfaced over density in Central Pasadena ... "It was a good idea to develop that area, but the way it has turned out has been overkill," said Berlinda Brown, a member of the city's General Plan Update Advisory Committee ...

It seems that what many people living in Pasadena are suffering from is a case of buyer's remorse. When the previous General Plan went down much of the development proposed was met with some enthusiasm. Particularly that involving the newly conceived "Transit Oriented Development" model. The Gold Line to Pasadena was nearing completion, and many saw this kind of accompanying development as being a progressive way to grasp this bold future. But now, 15 years later, and with the afflicted neighborhoods the home to large new structures and accompanying traffic congestion, the thrill was most definitely gone. And the prospect of even more of the same was bringing folks out to these public General Plan meetings and straight up to the speakers' podium where they spoke of their displeasure in unmistakable terms.

The West Pasadena Residents' Association News, which is not exactly what you would call a radical publication, recently published an editorial on the topic of building design. And in a very genteel kind of way the author of this opinion piece, Mic Hansen, shared her views on the matter. We're going to post some of them here to give you an idea of just how deeply this unhappiness with large scale development has permeated Pasadena's culture.

In some of the developments that we have seen since the mid-nineties, there has been a tendency to allow isolated rectilinear stone/stucco/glass boxes to rise, devoid of sensitivity to their surroundings, to quality, to style, and the aesthetics of their neighboring buildings, thus ignoring the importance of knitting the building into its context. We have repeated this gaffe over and over (to wit, Trio apartments between Colorado and Union at El Molino, Westgate at Del Mar and De Lacey, mixed use building on the southeast corner of Los Robles and Orange Grove, etc.). Understandably cost is a valid and constant consideration, but eschewing Pasadena's illustrious architectural history and sense of place, as well as denying context and neighborhood coherence cannot help but ill serve all involved interests.

The more of these (in the words of HRH Prince Charles) "carbuncles" get built, the more they erode the ineffable place that is Pasadena. Quality. Beauty. Beauty. Timelessness. These attributes seem often lost in our current practices. The intent is NOT to keep Pasadena in the past, but build for the present and the future in a manner that respects what has come before: genuine beauty, high quality materials and decoration, harmony with its environment, respectful of the culture and fabric of the community, visual and mass compatibility with the neighborhood, an effort to continue a "sense of place" and durability that are all hallmarks of excellent projects ...

Carbuncles indeed. So back to the public General Plan meetings. Certainly after hearing how the public felt about what had become of their community, and what was expected from those creating the new documents, the obvious remedy would be to incorporate their concerns. After all, public opinion had been solicited, and what was said seems to have been fairly loud and clear. But apparently that is not to be the case. This from the same Pasadena Star News article we quoted from above:

While some residents want tougher rules to check the city's population growth by discouraging new housing development, state laws make such restrictions very difficult to implement, said Stephanie DeWolf, deputy director of planning and development ... The state requires cities to plan ahead for certain amount of population growth per year. Each city receives a state-recommended number of new homes and apartments it must build in the future in order to accommodate that growth, De Wolf said ... As a result, De Wold added, Pasadena's General Plan update likely will not be a document that mandates slow-growth policies.

In other words the fix is in, and what DeWolf is telling us here is a bit of a very familiar cop out. Blaming state law for a lack of desire to contest RHNA numbers being pretty much the oldest trick in that book. We heard similar arguments put out here in Sierra Madre during the run up to the DSP/Measure V election, and somehow the world didn't end when it passed. Plus we have successfully contested RHNA numbers since, and quite successfully. And as far as I know nobody has sent in the National Guard.

Just because something is the legislated will of Sacramento doesn't mean abject surrender is the only recourse. Such things can be fought and, as we have seen in our town, with success.

Which is what City governments that represent those paying their salaries should be expected to do.

64 comments:

  1. It is a shame what has happened in Pasadena. Between the bad schools and the over and empty development the once beautiful city has been ruined forever. The city planners having ruined the west part of town are now moving east along Colorado Blvd to continue their destruction.

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  2. There seems to be two levels government in California works at. There is the real deal, which they share with those they do business with. Then there's the voters, which they seem to regard as a public relations problem. The end result of Pasadena's General Plan process was preordained. The dog and pony shows were just marketing.

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  3. Vive la differenceMarch 26, 2010 at 8:06 AM

    Pasadena is a complex city, the sixth largest in LA County. With a population about 137,000 more than Sierra Madre's, it has lost contact with it's people. The audience in the Council Chamber is about as large as Sierra Madre's. The difference is that the deals are all cut behind the scene. The various interests of the districts, the business community, the representatives of the PUSD, as well as developers, politics, clergy, and critics coalesce on Monday nights for a few short hours around an Agenda planned weeks in advance. The individual, the citizen, is often unheard and feels it is a waste of time to add his/her voice at the podium.

    Sierra Madre is about as large as a town can be and still be heard and still be responsive to its residents complaints and demands. Are we demanding and argumentative? You bet! And thus it's always been with town councils when there are sides to an issue. Can we come together in times of crisis in mutual aid? Certainly. And the earthquakes, fires, and mud flows are but a few examples.

    Do we cherish our way of life? Our small town atmosphere? Our children and our neighbor's children? Our seniors, our Little League, our Rose Float, the soccer and softball families, our Committees and Commissions? Yes we do.

    Do we always agree. Well, that's why we're here at the Tattler, right? And we love to hear and read the voice of the people.

    Vote on April 13!! It's the day people do business.

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  4. Assigned housing numbers, regardless of local need? Last I heard, that was called socialism.

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  5. 8:51

    or as it's now called "progressive".

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  6. Sorry 8:06, but as a Sierra Madre citizen who has begged the city council many times over many years, it is a waste of time to add your voice at the podium. The council does not direct the city staff to enforce codes. The council has been making back room deals with businesses that please and or pay them off. Why else would a business be allowed to operate without permits of any kind in spite of numerous complaints from "citizens at the podium", in the city hall offices, and to the police?

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  7. It used to be that development was needed to handle all the people moving to California. But since they haven't been showing up, the message is now development will save us from global warming. But since there has been some skepticism about that recently, maybe a new message will need to be created. How about high density condominium projects cure bad breath?

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  8. What business is being operated in town that doesn't pay for a business license?

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  9. This election is important, the three candidates you vote for, will determine whether the Canyon Zoning will be adopted, how the general plan wording will reflect the slow growth philosophy of the town's people. Whether you want to stop that direction, or turn back the clock to the Pro-high density growth philosophy of the Doyle, Buchanan, Mosca, Moran group that will turn Sierra Madre from a small town atmosphere into a Pasadena style condoland, it is in your hands.

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  10. I always like reading comments from Doylenoids about how "nobody has any plans for that kind of development here!" Right. But once they get the votes they need? Plans will just magically appear.

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  11. The business in Sierra Madre that does not have permits or pay for a business license, and completely ruins the quality of the neighbor's lives is Alverno, the wedding reception venue, with loud music, drunks etc. They violate the noise codes repeatedly among other things. The city is being paid off or something for them to ignore the law the way they do.

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  12. Sorry to digress from the subject, but I just read the Weekly's article about Tuesday's City Council meeting, and can't believe how BAD it is.

    I know that Von Rees is sympathetic to the Dirts and always has been, but the lies that Terry Miller wrote in that article show just how far that rag is willing to go to satisfy local development interests.

    If the City ever considers another paper to place it's legals in, it better NEVER be the Weekly!

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  13. By all means,close down Alverno.Developers can hardly contain themselves.If you think things are bad now..wait until a really Big development begins in your neighborhood.Sell now and get out what you can!

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  14. Yes, let's deny at risk young women a chance at a quality education. And in its place? Sierra Madre Villa Gardens Estates! Of course, one of the features will be the Villa itself, where the residents of this lifestyle meccas will party the night away.

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  15. I'm sure the Compeans and their neighbors could throw much better parties.

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  16. Considering the background of the parties complaining about Alverno; development interests and their lackies; I find their arguments to be hollow and self-serving.

    Maybe the City is hip to them as well?

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  17. Something that doesnt make sense here. Isn;t Transit Oriented Development suppose to mean that people won't drive so much and will take public tansportation? Why is traffic so much worse in pasadena now?

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  18. Watcher watching rerunMarch 26, 2010 at 12:26 PM

    I wasn't there the night of the gavel banging but I did watch the rerun. MaryAnn was even handed - she admonished Watts and he restrained himself. She let Mr. Hovesepian ramble at length in support of Mosca and only reined him in when he left Sierra Madre heading for fact finding in Machu Pichu. Ms. Willis, Ms. Moore, and Mrs. Angus are long time adversaries and have confronted Councilman Mosca at the podium before. One wonders what makes this night different from all other nights?

    I believe that speakers at the podium have been allowed in excess of three minutes (that was once the norm; Mayor Lambdin even had a timer) since MaryAnn has been mayor this cycle. She runs a tight meeting, ending at a reasonable time more often than not.

    What is different this night is Mosca's calling out to the City Attorney and ignoring the Mayor's call for a return to decorum (dare I say civility?). Given this is the last time Mr. Mosca has a soap box before the election I believe it to be that he precipitated a crisis in order to make himself a victim, thus proving his campaign platform, "MaryAnn is mean to me."

    The coming years are going to be critical for Sierra Madre. Many forces are aligned against us and our small town philosophy. MaryAnn, Kurt and Don balanced the budget and brought the Council back to conducting the people's business. Let's remember that in the ballot booth as we vote for Alcorn, Crawford and Watts.

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  19. The neighbors are not complaining about the school, only the nightclub business. Try to relax on weekends with a neighbor that holds drunken bashes. The police and city refuse to enforce the codes. If you had a party like they do, they would come and shut it down. If you did it repeatedly they would fine you. It has nothing to do with a quality education. Other schools seem to be able to raise enough money to run themselves without making the neighbors suffer. We would love to sell, but cannot because Alverno is pushing for a building that is larger than any building now in the whole city. They do not need a building that big. No one does, only a big nightclub needs warming ovens and 13,000 square feet and valet parking. And for those who say we are anti-Catholic that is not true either. I came to Sierra Madre in 1950 and Father O'Malley gave me my first holy communion. We want to sell our homes but would have to disclose the nuisance and proposed buildings. It is a nightmare, you have no idea because you are not there living it. It is not hollow or self serving. I have no interest in any development, I just want to enjoy my retirement in my own home but cannot.

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  20. The Moscateers have nothing to run on but soap operas and indignity. This is desperation at its finest.

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  21. I grew up in Sierra Madre and still have family living there. I'm intrigued by this blog and have read it carefully since the end of January, right before the electioneering began. I think Sir Eric/John Crawford's essays are interesting and to the point. The bloggers represent many positions and levels of understanding of the issues. In general Old Kentucky, Pasta, the chorus of Anonymous, Right Wing Rick, Watcher, and all of the others are outrageously funny, irreverent, and clever. If the others can't take the heat, they should get out of the kitchen.

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  22. I worked for a politician sometime ago and learned that politicians never garner votes by playing the victim card. Voters like politicians that exude strength, like Kurt Zimmerman and not weakness, like Councilman Mosca

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  23. So the Compeans want tax breaks for their solar business customers with Enid but they can't sell their house because Alverno is paying off the Police and City Hall. Well the residents and Alverno should let their lawyers work out a reasonable compromise, drink a toast to quieter nights and fewer drunken soirees in the Villa, be sure and publicly acknowledge that the crisis is at an end and list their houses with the local downtown realtors. Something for everyone, right?

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  24. bored with politicsMarch 26, 2010 at 12:57 PM

    If half the lots at One Crater are sold how come there are no plans coming to the Planning Commission? What's going on up there? What's going on with Stonehouse? The Heflin's home is up for sale.

    Will we get back to those story lines on April 14th? I can hardly wait. Just vote for heaven's sake.

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  25. I hate to tell you, but I am not "the Compeans". They are not the only people who cannot sleep at night because of the parties. They want to stay, I am so fed up I want to sell. We cannot sell, no one gets it. With disclosures required when selling about the giant building no one in their right mind would buy.I do not have an attorney either. I do not have enough money to hire a lawyer, I wish I did. Alverno would never be reasonable. Don't you know their history? Staff members embezzling money etc? They don't want the money flow to stop. If City Hall is not being paid off, why are they not enforcing their own codes?

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  26. Decline to State - it seems obvious to me that the strategy being employed by the democrat endorsed candidate is out of desperation. He knows he is on the wrong side on the development issue, and he needs a big distraction to get around that. He can't discuss his record and win. What is sad here is he seems willing to smear this town as a hotbed of hate just to advance his career. He got more votes than anyone else in 2006, and his detractors are all people who worked for his campaign then.

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  27. South Pas neighborMarch 26, 2010 at 1:12 PM

    I grew up in Pasadena, and it was a beautiful city. Mic Hansen got it right. The charm of the place was in lush trees, non-congested roads, artistic buildings and real population diversity. Fair Oaks and Colorado was the rough part of town, and the Gap was only in the front teeth of the drunks who used to roll around there, by some great Mexican restaurants. The streets really were beautifully accommodating, and the mountain views were clear.
    Now I avoid the place because the traffic is terrible.

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  28. Anon @ 11:58

    Code enforcement has been a BIG PROBLEM in Sierra Madre for years now. The Fire Marshall turned Fire Chief, hasn't inspected a commercial piece of property in over 5 years and the "code enforcement officer" is just a henchman for the pro-development forces inside City Hall.

    Ultimately, the City Council is powerless since giving away most of it's authority under the Bart Doyle regime. Now, the City Manager and City Attorney hold all the cards and determine what the Council does and does not discuss.

    I wouldn't be the least bit surprised if certain administrators at Alverno are on the take. They may actually be the ones (moles) responsible for the persistent problems that will eventually undermine the school and close it once and for all, as was the plan all along.

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  29. Oops....I meant Anon @ 12:58

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  30. It is up to the citizens of Pasadena to push back against the party line that their city officials give them.
    The General Plan is supposed to be the community's vision for the future - not the Developer Servicing Department's vision, the CITIZENS' Vision.
    To borrow a phrase from Shirley Moore, the vision is NOT the vision of "the wolves of overdevelopment huffing maniacally at our doors"
    If all the towns will stand up against the forced ruination of the quality of life and real sustainability of our towns, the push back will work.

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  31. Hey 12:57, I saw a young businesswoman go into city hall with an armfull of blueprints.
    Couldn't help but think she was Carter bound.

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  32. You need to elect the right people to keep your town. There is too much money to be made, and it takes special people to stay loyal.

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  33. I just noticed 11:59. Since when are Alverno's students at risk? To hear them tell it 100% go to college. They all come from the finest families. Now the neighbors are denying poor young girls an education. If they are unable to go to Alverno, then they can go to public school like the rest of us.

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  34. I'm gonna get corny on ya here, 1:22. I think most Americans would want to keep their towns humanly sized - and those who want the big cities know where they are. I can just hear the calls of "Naive," but I think freedom makes people strong and, eventually, reasonable. The biggest problem is like Watts was saying at the candidates forum, citizen disconnect - lack of participation. Too many people just don;t get it that the decisions made at councils & in town halls determine what will happen - and that they can have a hand in those decisions.

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  35. I think the Alverno folks, neighbors & school, need ther own blog.

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  36. another problem, 1:41, is the problems of local politics are difficult to understand. most people would rather hand all that stuff over to others to take care for them. you don't have to go too far to see how that works out.

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  37. 1:47

    Don't include me in your blanket statements. I don't think local politics are difficult to understand and I know dozens of others in Sierra Madre that have no problem grasping the intricacies of local politics.

    If local politics are so difficult to understand then why have the people of Sierra Madre, along with other cities, been able to affect positive change?

    Please, keep your condescension to yourself.

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  38. I agree 1:47, and I am guilty of doing that very thing. I hear city managers launch into status updates or warrant discussions and a little buzzing sound goes off in my ears and I do believe I may doze.
    BUT!
    There are the big old obvious issues, and that's different. Watch for lawyers, watch for developers, watch for realtors - there are some signs, & then we got to get with it.

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  39. you need to look at all the cities that haven't "grasped the intricacies." wasn;t talking about this one. but it -along with a few others- are exceptions.

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  40. Many of us remember the dog & pony shows we went through on the Downtown Specific Plan (which just be the way was fully grown - now in a period of forced stagnation), and the whole community outreach thing. And that did no damn good. I agree with 2:04 that most of the cities don't get what may be happening, what a charade the public input process is until its too late. But look at the words from the Pasadena GP website:
    "The community’s comments at the events have been incorporated into a Draft Outreach Summary Report. The draft report and technical appendix are now being circulated among city commissions and the community will have a 45-day period to provide comments ending on April 19, 2010. Provide your comments on the draft report now."
    And that is it folks, that's where the community activists have got to kick it up.

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  41. 2:15, you're right, there's a huge split between the agenda behind City of Pasadena Planning Staff and what the residents many of the *city leadership* want Pasadena to be. Mic Hansen gave voice to it via WPRA. They're dealing with the same development issues and backdoor developer influence that Sierra Madre is, but they're further down the path. Take that as a precursor of Sierra Madre's future if the development folks get seats on the Council.

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  42. Just wait until the residents of Pasadena find out the motivation behind the statements of Stephanie DeWolf, deputy director of planning and development, or Developer Servicing as a previous poster had it. AB32 & it's unholy spawn SB375 would polish off Pasadena for good. There could be a great voting drive there to 'postpone' SB375. Maybe it could live in our library next to the DSP.

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  43. Pasadena is the happy hunting ground for that crap. Aren't they running out of water or something?

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  44. also channel 3 watcherMarch 26, 2010 at 2:45 PM

    Did anyone else hear Josh Moran say that SB375 was good for local control? That it gave cities greater local control?
    I think I heard that - or did I have too much wine with dinner?

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  45. Josh would say the sun sets in the east if he was told to. It's one thing when a politician says things because he doesn't think people will understand anyway. But it is one step beyond when a politican is told to say things he doesn't understand because those listening are even less capable of getting it. The blind leading the blind.

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  46. Did he say that? Did he say that SB375 gives cities local control?

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  47. Yes of course the Moron said that.
    I heard it.

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  48. The reason that SB 375 claims to be about "local control" is because the local cities have "representation" in SCAG. You saw what happened when Don and Maryann had to essentially take over the empty chair that Mosca was supposed to be sitting in. Got the numbers lowered, but that's not what the city's residents actually wanted. Sierra Madre doesn't need that kind of housing growth at all, but there doesn't seem to be any recourse at all on that issue. So I would not agree that SB 375 has any element of local control in it.

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  49. Thanks 3:06.
    SCAG promotes local control the way that.....
    a 2009 Toyota Camry makes you safe
    or
    the council of 2004 protected the hillsides

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  50. SCAG promotes local control like the German army brought law and order to France in 1940.

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  51. SCAG promotes local control the way John Buchanan practices brevity

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  52. I remember our first General Plan in 1996. A lot of residents joined in on that, residents wrote it, and it's pretty darn good.
    The problem is with the lawyers. You have to have a lawyer tough enough to defend that document. Can't be any kind of a surrender monkey.
    That's what happened to the pretty darn good first HMZ. The lawyer who was supposed to defend it was a surrender monkey.

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  53. Been there, done thatMarch 26, 2010 at 3:49 PM

    Coming into this discussion very late - but 9:13, it can do good to go up to the podium. Persist - it may be 100 times, but persist. Get a few pals too. You have to organize a few like minded souls. And you might still lose your cause, but it won't be because you gave up.
    I empathize with the Alverno neighbors, because I have been in a situation like theirs. It is maddening to know that ordinances are being ignored and the officials who are supposed to enforce them are not doing it, for whatever reasons. I just don't get why Alverno isn't made responsible for effective security.
    And resident who feels like you can't sell? Have you tried putting your house on the market? It's surprising sometimes what people want, like a family that might want to live next to their daughters' future school, and how full disclosure won't hurt a sale.
    Organize neighbors. Everybody call the police every time there's a violation of any kind & then go to the next council meeting & tell them.

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  54. I'm with 3:49.
    The school should get good 24/7 security & a whole lot of these problems would be solved.

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  55. Ok, I just read the Sierra Madre Weekly and Terry Miller's attack on Mr Crawford. I have a few comments. First, I have always liked Terry Miller, thought he took some fantastic photos, and I've always admired Mr Crawford for his straight-forward approach to his writing. If memory serves me correctly; the Sierra Madre weekly used Mr Crawford's aka, Eric Mundry's articles all the time. Interesting that when it worked for them...they were all for it. Now that Mr Crawford is running for city Council, they don't want anything to do with him! Politics at BEST! Terry, The cumquat was not a "parody" as you put it, but an obscene, infantile attack on well respected folks. Do you really think Ms. Angus enjoyed the "parody" against her?

    Let us not forget that this all about free speech. I voted for Joe Mosca, because I believed he was going to preserve our town. I didn't know then that he was a gay American and truth be told, I wouldn't have cared. I still would have voted for him. I can guarantee you that on April 13, Mr Mosca will not have my vote and it's NOT because he is a gay American, it's because I think we need someone else who can preserve our town. It's too bad that Mr. Mosca has decided to throw "homophobic" into the mix, or maybe you did that, Terry. I honestly expected more from both of you.

    I'm voting for Crawford, Alcorn and Watts. Thank you all for running.

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  56. I was struck by the lack of any other perspectives to the story than Mr. Mosca's. Was the Mayor contacted for an interview? Or did all that shining bright intelligence scare 'em away?
    In fact, was anyone who was not in the PoorJoe camp get contacted or interviewed?
    Remarkably skewered article.

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  57. Absolutely no mention of what the speakers had to say. It's like their opinions didn't matter at all. All that counted was Joe.

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  58. When a "Village Idiot" is your only supporter, you should know it's time to pack up your carpet bag.

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  59. Terry Miller's heartfelt defense of the Cumquat didn't come completely without an agenda. After all, it is on this blog that he was outed as being a contributor. Something that has made him unfit in certain circles of polite society.

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  60. The Cumquat had at least 3 contributing writers.
    All were moral deviants.

    The content of that website was disgusting.

    It tells you the caliber of the dirts who supported it. Pretty low class individuals.

    The three candidates they have this selected to carry their "dirt agenda" this election are among the lowest caliber in recent memory.

    I suppose Doyle, Stockley and Lambdin were equally low class, they sure weren't on the side of the people of Sierra Madre, neither are Mosca and Moran or Walsh. All supported by Bart Doyle, Glenn Lambdin and Rob Stockley.

    What else do we need to know? Pass on these three, Sierra Madre. They represent the continuation of corruption.

    Crawford, Watts and Alcorn will be working for you the people. What a concept! What a concept!!
    Politicians that work for us, instead of corrupt Sacramento special interest crowd.

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  61. So Terry Miller couldn't be bothered to attend the City Council Meeting (MaryAnn sweater groupies know that the photo in the weekly was not the sweater she was wearing Tuesday night); couldn't be bothered to call Crawford for his side, couldn't be bothered to talk with the Mayor; and wrote a hit job on Crawford to get even for being outed as a Cumquat contributor. Was the Tattler mentioned at the City Council that night? I don't think so. Miller and Rees should be writing for the Enquirer. Parody indeed. It's clear to me that Miller is pond scum.

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  62. Terry, Joe, and Johnny B. The Three Cumquat Stooges.

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  63. Yes, Mosca/Matt are "persons of interest"as possible contributors to that smutty depraved website.
    Lambdin is also a "person of interest".

    Arnold Miquel Perez is also a "person of interest".

    Someone asked a question of yesterday's blog
    "who was the clergyman who supported the website"

    The man who subs as a fireman is a "person of interest" in that one.

    Also the guy who was the president of the Rotary, forgot his name, pal of Joe Mosca.

    There are several suspects, but the above are the prime ones.

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  64. "The fix is in" for Pasadena. Well put, Tattler, and so true.

    But I say, its time for Pasadena to take a lesson from Sierra Madre and the Tattler: "Just because something is the legislated will of Sacramento doesn't mean abject surrender is the only recourse. Such things can be fought and, as we have seen in our town, with success."

    Exactly.

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