Thursday, September 23, 2010

The Gang of Four Now Has A Golden Opportunity To Keep Their 'Slow Growth' Campaign Promises

So a new developer has shown up to try their luck here in Fort Apache. And it looks like they have their eyes on the property now occupied by what remains of the Skilled Nursing Facility. This company is known by the name of Homes By Warmington, and the picture you see here is an approximation of what they have in mind for Sierra Madre's most contentious slice of property. I took it from one of their websites. Packed, stacked and whacked being the description that immediately comes to mind.

Here is how they enjoy being described on their Homes By Warmington.com website:

About Warmington, Our Legacy: Four generations ago, the Warmington name achieved recognition as highly sought-after (sic) builder of classic estate homes for some of the decade's emerging screen legends including Claudette Colbert, Bing Crosby, Henry Fonda, Tyrone Power and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. By the 1930's Warmington had become unofficially known as the "builder to the stars," and was designing and building custom homes in some of the country's most prestigious Southern California locations like Beverly Hills, Bel Air and Westwood, among others.

In the 1940's Warmington broadened its presence in the in the (sic) homebuilding industry by creating well-planned neighborhoods designed to meet the needs of the American family. Although less grand in scale, these homes reflected much of the same quality craftmanship and attention to detail that was present in the grand estate homes first built by the company. Over the next several decades, The Warmington group of companies remained committed to planning and developing a variety of new home communities and became a trusted name in the homebuilding industry for thousands of families. Today, it is estimated that approximately 30,000 families live in Warmington-built homes.

I swear it must be the same guy that writes all these plummy sounding developer websites.

All the assurances of superiority in homebuilding heritage and developing aside, the reality about the Warmington bunch that descended on our fair town recently is somewhat different. And by all accounts it would seem that they are serenely confident in their expectations that this town will give them all they need to bring their plans to life. After all, they knew Bing Crosby.

What they would like to do is construct a series of one and two story houses on the Skilled Nursing Facility site. The streetside front row of homes would be 1,400 square foot single story affairs. All in accordance with what they believe we want to see in our community, I suppose. Behind these would be two-story 2,300 square footers. And in order to maximize the property available for them to build on, the distance between each of these "meet the needs of the American family" cribs would be a mere 10 very shady feet. Or just about room enough for three blue recycling trash cans laid end to end.

There are some problems here, probably more than I know about as of this typing. But one thing that immediately jumps out is the zoning currently in place for that part of town. The Skilled Nursing Facility is in an area of that is zoned for commercial buildings and activities. In order for these wedged in wickiups to be constructed and inhabited by real American families there would have to be a zoning change to residential. When it was pointed out to the Warmingtonians that this could end up being both an expensive and futile little proposition, they didn't seem fazed. Which means they either have great confidence in the use of expensive attorneys for browbeating local governments into shape, or they just don't know what they're getting into.

I suspect it is a little of both. And who knows, maybe they've been watching our City Council meetings on SMTV3 and wrongfully assumed the Gang of Four is actually in charge.

This community has long had its heart set on some sort of Emergency Medical Facility for that property. And while many of those kinds of companies have been called, none ever stood up and saluted. At least so far. So the odds that an outfit of this ilk would eventually show up and place an application to build what is described above naturally improved over time.

During our recent election Joe Mosca, Nancy Walsh and Roots all solemnly stood before the people of Sierra Madre and testified about their allegiance to the slow growth traditions that are deeply ingrained in the Sierra Madre ethos. And certainly even they must understand that rezoning the Skilled Nursing Facility property for residential use so that some outfit can build densely packed generic row housing would not exactly be living up to those promises.

So maybe we owe a vote of thanks to the people at The Warmington Group. Because they have now given these three individuals the opportunity to show the skeptics that they really meant what they said. And they are going to stick to their promises.

It would be unfortunate if they didn't.

87 comments:

  1. Of all the types of construction that could be built there, these sound like the lesser of the evils. Lord knows a lot of work has gone on attracting a skilled nursing facility. Our past Mayor, no stranger to the needs a community has for a medical building, put a lot of work into finding just such an owner. She had a group working on that to no avail. I would much rather see single family dwellings go in rather that an ugly Monrovia type of multi use buildings attracting short term residents above who knows what kind of business.

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  2. Personally I think we should work towards getting the SNF historic status. It should serve as an eternal monument to the failed DSP.

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  3. The property is too small for a skilled nursing facility; maybe an urgent care center. Get over yourself Sierra Madre. Best use? A new library. Sell the old one to Warmington.

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  4. What would this town do with a new library when the one we have already is an uninhabited and very expensive white elephant?

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  5. Is Sierra Madre is broke, how can we benefit with a huge new expensive Warmington? Who will afford this Beverly Hills type? Will this really increase our tax base enough to make a difference?

    Yes, back to the library. Fabulous idea that somehow got dropped. Never saw G4 in Library.

    Get the petition going now: MOVE THE LIBRARY!

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  6. I am all in favor of moving the library. Do you think Pasadena would take it?

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  7. Change we can believe in!September 23, 2010 at 7:26 AM

    I agree with the first poster. The Warmington option might be the best available. As for density, recall that some of our most cherished historical structures are courtyard apartment homes, stacked side by side and sharing a small strip of land between them. They foster a communal feel, represent efficient land use, and provide some level of privacy.

    We must keep the library. In fact today, rather than explore the endless library available on the internet machine, i plan on hopping in the tin lizzy and driving down to the library to blow the dust off copies of zane grey's latest. hope officer berry doesn't catch me speedin' while i'm at it.

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  8. 6:58 A.M. "Get over yourself Sierra Madre." In case you didn't notice, Sierra Madre is a small town, we don't need a big facility. You are obviously fairly new to town with your get over yourself comment, how rude. If you live here then you were charmed into town and that is what we are trying to preserve here. Your get over yourself comment is not very charming, try to have an educating day.

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  9. Could this be that's why the gang of 4 are so intent in expanding the general plan update committee with their friends and family? How convenient it would be to just change the general plan to make the SNF property residential. And, maybe that's why they are in such a hurry to get the gpu done.

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  10. The problem with the SNF and it'd development is timing.
    Who, would want to invest and build (and gamble)with the financial issues of crushing taxes, upside down realestate values, and general economic fears with no good incentive for business, dogging us here.
    Perhaps the sight would be ideal for a hospital for mentally disturbed developers and realtors

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  11. An asylum for recalled councilmembers might be needed soon. What more fitting location than the SNF?

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  12. I did notice a bit of a spruce-up the other day--plywood off the windows and the curtians now /still hanging did not look in tatters. Years ago, when the city needed to expand the City Hall, PD and FD, people went to the City Council meetings in the old city hall to be sure that the needs of the Community Health Center were not compromised by the actiiviities of the PD and FD across the street. Hum! Somehow, those concerns come to mind again when you consider putting lux homes (or condos for that matter) across the street from a busy municiple facility.

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  13. The city should look at moving the library into the old Howie's supermarket site. Maybe that property's current owners would want to donate it to the children of Sierra Madre. Then we could sell the existing building and pay off some of that awful bond debt.

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  14. I want to buy a street-side Warminington-Fuzzy and watch the illegal aliens defending the borders of memorial park from mothers and children. Wait. I've lost my sense of humor. I think of the soldiers memorialized in that park, and I'm disgusted that their heroic sacrifices have been mocked by a government in Sierra Madre, Sacramento, Washington that refuses to enforce its own immigration laws.

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  15. I'm wondering why an acute-care facility at the SNF site wouldn't be the most appropriate use, along with a small health clinic and perhaps office spaces for home health service providers and home-care nursing. Those kinds of businesses can accommodate the changing health needs of a community that will probably move with the times and see people remaining in their homes for a much longer time, mirroring the national trend. It also doesn't create a live-in population, so would be more appropriate for a commercial area. The service model for health care is becoming hugely prevalent and it doesn't require a full-blown hospital to provide these health support mechanisms to the local community. Also, hospitals/SNF have to be very expensively built up to code and heavily monitored, whereas clinics are more appropriate to small facilities that aren't under the purview of OSHPD. All kinds of health services such as acupuncture, chiropractic care, physical therapy, workout gyms, etc. can be accommodated in small spaces at that location and in the immediate area, and are completely family-friendly from the kids on up to great-grandma.

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  16. Do you think any of Warmin' Fuzzyton's famous movie star friends would move into these houses? I'm hoping for at least Tom Arnold or Carrot Top.

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  17. Good point, 8:05. Maybe Peewee Herman could move in. He'd make a great addition to the 4th of July Parade Committee.

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  18. 8:04 AM ,,, you are spot on, we really need such a facility here in town, we need to all help achieve that ending. Hope council can look to the future of the City on this one and not their small group of supporters. Well stated 8:04, thank you.

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  19. How is that Clavicle?September 23, 2010 at 8:39 AM

    The Warmington Group, lot of internet sites, looks like Las Vegas homes are 139 thous up to 200, and in California the same structure, 705 thousand. But I think in a commercial area about to be turned multi by the city needs the bucks rationalization, the townhomes they build so reasonable in CA for 295 thousand???, will be the ticket unless you already know it will be SFR's by the word approximation.

    Perhaps new transparency in government,can best be illustrated by the wearing of bright orange T-shirts to the council meetings will remind them.

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  20. Amen, I Care. Thank you. I agree as well.

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  21. Expensive homes directly across the street from the Fire Station?

    Hey volunteer fire fighters! You don't think your dear friends, the Gang of 4 might be planning on getting rid of you all?

    A traffic signal would have to be put up there.
    It makes sense that the "gang" may be planning on farming out the VFD.

    And to think you all accused MaryAnn, Crawford, Watts and Alcorn of having this in mind.

    News flash to the VFD:
    MaryAnn, Crawford, Watts and Alcorn would have kept you in place, but you believed the lies you were told.
    Hope for your sakes it doesn't come back and bite you in the butt!

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  22. The members of the SMVFD should start to wonder just what exactly their leadership owns in this town. Or who they owe, for that matter. And where their true priorities lie.

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  23. You idiots, a new library would mean a bond costing between six and eight millions dollars. Since the new library would be bigger and offer more services (nothing gets smaller) which equates to more people + more to PEERS the cost would rocket up. People and the city can not afford more debt. Our library is for young children and the seniors. It is totally unusable for high school students.

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  24. Attention Tattler Research Team!

    Please investigate this company, Warmington.
    I've heard something about them, can't remember what it was, but it wasn't good.

    Hint: It was connected to organized crime.
    Isn't current owner of the property or former owner, Emile Fish? It has been speculated that Fish is heavily connected to east coast crime syndicates.
    The Delaware Corporation comes to mind.

    Hope this isn't the case, but you do have Emile Fish's pal, Mosca involved?

    Check it out.

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  25. 8:04 If you think an acute care facility is the best use and sorely needed in town, I suggest that YOU cough up $3,000,000 to purchase the property and another couple million to build it. Many Sierra Madrean are a bunch of spoiled children WE WANT WE WANTWE WANT but they do not put their money were their mouth is. Whatever conforms to Measure V can be built. In case you have forgotten it is 2 stories, 30 feet, and 13 units per area (more if there are low income units). Since that property is on a slope there will be a fight to determine what is grade for the back units. Just better fix the city's parking ordinance FAST.

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  26. 9:05
    Some of you dirts did put your money where your mouths were, and invested in these DSP projects.
    You lost your asses.

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  27. 8:41 The G4's plan is to get the volunteer fire department P A I D to be the VFD.

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  28. Hey FAST, at 9:05

    Aren't you the guy who wants to move the library to the SNF.

    The same guy who had kids hold up signs a few years ago in the 4th of July parade, saying "don't close our library"?
    When none of the council members had ever even considered that?

    The same guy who walked around town after Measure V passed, pushing a baby stroller, head hanging, looking like someone should call the suicide hotline for you?

    The same guy who got in trouble with an employer over a dubious "loan" to a developer?

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  29. The CIty Zoning map clearly shows the SNF property is Commercial. There would need to be a zone change. It will be up to the Planning Commission to say yes or no. A no vote will be appealed to the G4 plus Maryann. If the G4 votes yes then a RECALL is in order.

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  30. Inquiring minds want to knowSeptember 23, 2010 at 9:48 AM

    So how come Fred Wesley's Wistaria Village condo project with underground parking and street level commercial was okay and the Warmington-Fuzzy Garden Estates are not okay? Are they both not residential? Is it only because Fred had the forsight to build in some boarded up commerical space? We know the street side one story "homettes" will be 1,400 sq feet; the footprint for the two story "homes" will probably sit on 1,400 sq ground feet so how many 1,400 sq feet boxes can be dropped in with 10 feet between? If Measure V says 13 per acre... where will the cars park? The scooters and golf carts?

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  31. In Sierra Madre a slow growth promise is something that must be kept.

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  32. The CC-1 is on the move.
    Bunch of new houses in the SNF, water rate hike to make sure we're attractive enough, and oh yeah, solvent, and TAKE OVER MONTECITO AND GET RID OF THOSE RIFF RAFF ARTISTS.
    Damn

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  33. Looks like the CRA is making another move on the "Montecito Arts District." Thanks Joe! Slow growth my a**.

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  34. 9:05, that "low income" stuff is a farce.
    "Low income" without a covenant means "low income for a little bit, and then what the market will bear Baby,"

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  35. Usually the low income farce falls apart when the accountant tells the developer that the money he will lose by not keeping to the low income restrictions is far outweighed by what he will get for selling the units for as much money as he can get. What we are seeing at Montecito and elsewhere is gentrification plain and simple. So much for our liberal Dems on the city council who bleed for the poor. That is just window dressing. Just like their pretensions of being green. These people answer to developers and NOT the people.

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  36. I knew Buchanan was for development. How? It was called One Carter, and then there was the dsp.
    I knew Joe was for development. How? He supported the dsp, and with Buchanan fought like hell to keep the damning EIR away from the citizens.
    Josh Moran is in the real estate business. Figure it out.
    Nancy Walsh said she changed her mind about voting for Measure V.
    Saying "Our wonderful village" 20 times does not translate to slow growth.

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  37. "Our precious jewel of a community."

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  38. If this city allows the artists and yes some of the poorer residents in town to be moved out of Montecito, to have those unique places turned into "artists lofts/work spaces" that only wealthy people can afford, it will be a testament to the fact that Sierra Madre has lost ALL integrity.

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  39. sierra Madreans for Sane Financial PracticesSeptember 23, 2010 at 11:00 AM

    Ah yes the library plan, still, on Fred Wesleys company web site.
    Yes, we're rolling in dough & why not make a nice new library? Or hey, maybe we could get some bonds for it!

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  40. Sir Eric!
    Your natural born/hard won skepticism has failed you!
    "...they either have great confidence in the use of expensive attorneys for browbeating local governments into shape, or they just don't know what they're getting into."
    Don't know what they're getting into? Developers with plumy websites?
    Their attorneys no doubt started preparing the case many moons ago.

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  41. Buchanan has long pushed for a "land swap" to allow for a new library at the snf site, and apts. at the current library site. Money to build a new library has been the only issue.

    I agree with 9:05 that this is private property and if it conforms to current zoning ordinances, it can be built. All of us have to be vigilant, though to remember this is corner property and there are certain restrictions on set-backs, ingress/egress, etc. And, of course parking. Let's keep a careful eye on this one.

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  42. Of course we want to spend money on a new library. This new fangled online thing, that the majority of residents can access a text from anywhere in the world in any language in the world, is just a fad.

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  43. Harken back to the dsp discussions.
    There was a little problem about developing the SNF with lots o' parking because across the street are the emergency services.

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  44. The stealth CRA/Montecito situation is being looked into. We will have a report up tomorrow morning.

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  45. Montecito Plan? What Montecito Plan? The one that died a few years back?
    Anybody got a list of the property owners?
    How many LLCs are we talking about?
    Who's gonna get rich by removing the more 'unsightly' dwellings there?

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  46. Good point, 11:13!

    We have the E. Pasadena library and the huge Arcadia library close enough to Sierra Madre.
    We do not need any library here, really, not anymore.

    There must be some ulterior motive for the "gang" to want to move the library. I haven't figured it out, YET, but we will.

    Anything the "gang" does is not in the best interest of the vast majority of Sierra Madre residents, ever.

    Not unlike their Bell counterparts, they are up to no damn good!

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  47. It is naive to think that a zone change or a general plan change or any other kind of change cannot happen if the council majority wants it to happen.
    They have too much authority.

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  48. OMG!
    I just got an email from one of the residents:

    Check this out, Crawford, can you put this up better than I can do here?

    I did not receive anything in the mail, none of my neighbors have either. We all live in the proposed affected area. Whats the gang of 4's plan this time to take my home?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVDyjfC27gs

    This is shocking. SHOCKING!

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  49. Hey faithful reader, I do believe you underestimate the developers. Their attorneys probably have many appropriate boilerplate filings ready. Just a little white out and hey presto Attorney Levin can buy multiple homes.

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  50. Sorry for getting back to the issue at hand.

    It's my belief and understanding that a commercial district is meant for COMMERCE. After listening to crooks like Enid Joffe and Rob Stockly complain about the need to raise sales taxes in the City, how, exactly, is building residential units in the COMMERCIAL District going to spur economic activity for the City?

    And...

    Where are we all to shop after the retail/commercial real estate has been dozed for condos?

    I too would like to see an urgent care facility of some sort at the SNF. But, if that is not possible, then it should be developed for it's intended purpose; Retail and Commercial Office Space.

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  51. Old Kentucky, is there a title or a site name on the you tube video?, it is easier to look for that way for me.

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  52. Buchanan wants a new library so he have something to point to as his ego drivenlegacy, regardless of what it costs.

    The dude must have 50 mirrors in his house just so he can see himself everywhere he turns.

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  53. I'd like to see a combination funeral palor and strip club built at the SNF.

    We could name it, LUCKY STIFFS.

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  54. Sierra Madre Boulevard from Michillinda to Santa Anita could be designated Commerical for all it matters! If business owners don't come, it doesn't matter what it's zoned. Clearly some faction has never given up on the DSP. Call it what you like they're just slithering around Measure V, building what they started oh so many years ago.

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  55. Here's a thought:
    Old timers who worked on the old general plan say that the town is lacking open space, violating state requirements or something.
    How about a park at the SNF site?

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  56. A skateboard park would be a good addition to the community. Teenagers and young adults are the most underserved part of this town.

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  57. A park with a statue, say, of Mark Twain, reading a book, so the current generation of illiterates, will have an idea what reading was. I hope some of you are kidding about building a new library.

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  58. Also, how about a portion set aside for the state mandated homeless shelter?

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  59. Y'all are aware that the pro-development folks won the last election?

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  60. The statue should actually be of Belva Plain. Her explorations of the rich tapestry of the heart are far more popular with Sierra Madre readers than anything Mark Twain ever wrote.

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  61. How about striving to do nothing. Spend none of my money. Stop doing and start being.

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  62. In a democracy the right to free speech and opinion belongs to all, 3:22. Move to North Korea if you want to experience the complete dominance of a government in power.

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  63. 3:24 That's a very harsh judgement on the literacy of Sierra Madrans.

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  64. So did you actually read any Belva PlainSeptember 23, 2010 at 3:35 PM

    Funny 3:24, Random house said the same thing, "No one explores the rich tapestry of the human heart as Belva Plain does. Her more than twenty New York Times bestsellers have captivated readers and..."

    Plagerism stinks!

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  65. 3:22 we're aware that the pro-development folks won the election. Recall, however, that the pro-development majority on the Council didn't stop Kevin Dunn and Kurt Zimmerman from organizing SMRRD and seeing to the passage of a slow growth initiative.

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  66. Who's Belva Plain?

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  67. 3:35. My money is on Crawford and Zimmerman and not the Gang of Four.

    BTW. It's nice to see a Mosca supporter, like 3:35, actually admitting that Mosca is pro-development.

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  68. Sorry, I meant 3:22 and not 3:35

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  69. The pro-development folks won the last election because they lied and claimed that they were really preservationists.

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  70. Belva Plain writes novels where men listen to the cares of women, and respect their feelings once they've had a chance to discuss them at length. They're located in the 'fantasy' section of any bookstore or library.

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  71. You mean to say they're NOT preservationists, 3:43? Oh good Lordy, how do I get my vote back?

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  72. So, maybe those who voted for the team of four really want high-rise and density in our downtown and we are bucking the tide. (I should emphasize voters, since only 33% of the citizens voted.) But I don't think so. Everyone I talk to in town including at least one merchant on Baldwin does not want large developments going up on Montecito, Howies or at the SNF. He cites parking and general congestion which would hurt his business.

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  73. I don't get it, if the Joes were pro-development, how came they said they were slow growth?

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  74. Herchel at 2:10

    It's on Neuroblast, I think.
    The "Mod" will put up all the info tomorrow, we hope.
    Thanks for being interested, I know you're from out of town, but a very good friend to Sierra Madre.

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  75. 4:39. I hope that you're new to the board and not a Troll.

    Joe got elected in 2006 by promising to put the downtown specific plan on a ballot for the voters' approal or rejection. However, when Zimmerman moved to put the DSP on the ballot, Joe voted with a resounding "No." Joe claimed that the reason he broke his promise was because the DSP had not been completed. However, once it was completed, Joe and the rest of the Council would determine whether the voters would have an opportunity to vote on it.

    After being ridiculed at Council meetings and in the press, Joe back-tracked and offered up a time-line whereby the voters would be offered a chance to cast a "non-binding" vote on the DSP. In other words, the approval or disapproval of the DSP would still be the responsibility of the Council and not the voters.

    Joe can be observed in the act of breaking his promise on neuroblast.

    It's was clear to anyone following SM politics that Joe was a supporter of the draft DSP, which would have converted the downtown to mixed-use condo complexes.

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  76. It's really simple 4:39. When Joe was re-elected and Josh and Nancy were elected, the developers, real estate agents, contractors and pro-development politicians in the Council Chambers cheered enthusiastically.

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  77. Recall Joe almost workedSeptember 23, 2010 at 5:55 PM

    Cute 4:39.
    Mr. Mosca and veracity parted company long ago.

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  78. 3:35 Belva Plain is actually a pen name of Anne Rice, one of my favorite authors, she wrote 7 books under Belva. My fav is " The Witching Hour" She is best known the author of the vampire cronicles, that was made into a movie a blond Tom Cruise was in. She was in New Orleans but moved to Palm springs,

    Old Kentucky found it thank you

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  79. So who wrote the other 23 Belva Plain books? And the volumes of short stories before that? Somehow the photos on the book jackets don't look like Anne Rice...

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  80. This is a Belva Plain/Anne Rice thread??????

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  81. It started as a conversation about the library, and I think the person who brought up old Belva meant it as a comment on the large selection of bodice rippers offered there.

    That's my guess.

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  82. Wandered off into uncharted territory, thanx John
    ;-)

    This happens on discussion groups and listservs all the time, sometimes it's interesting and other times it's just silly but fun.

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  83. Anyone who was at City Hall when Joe was crowned king of the council would have realized that the majority of the crowd (invited by our City Manager from a list given to her by Joe)were the developers,realtors and contractors.
    It didn't take them long to get the ball rolling. Only five months into his reign and things are quickly beginning to take shape. Why do you think the snf stood empty all this time? Waiting, waiting, waiting. It's not a coincidence that it didn't sell before the election.

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  84. when I first moved into Sierra Madre, it never entered my mind that within hours of moving into town thatI needed to join key organizations and immediately start trying to immerse myself into the political scene of Sierra Madre.

    That's what Joe Mosca and John Buchanan did.

    Sort of makes me wonder about their true intentions of serving the needs of their employers business interests.

    Certainly they both can't be completely self absorbed narcassistic me me me me me me delusional dweebs...can they?...to think that a city of a hundred years of history needs the wisdom of two nobody's who move into our community and immediately decide that they each know what we need in our community?

    It's probably both.

    Mosca and Buchanan are on the Council to serve their employers and at the same time self serve a character flaw of inflated self importance.

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  85. I don't mind, Laurie. Actually, I kind of like it. It's like being at a good party.

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  86. YES, HOWIES MARKET AND THE SKILLED NURSING FACILITY ARE REVERSE CORNERS LOTS. THEIR REAR YARDS (LOT LINES) BACK UP TO ANOTHER PROPERTIES SIDE YD. THAT MEANS A 25 FT SETBACK FROM EACH CORNER. THAT DRAMITICALLY LIMITS THE AMOUNT OF UNITS THAT CAN BE BUILT.
    WE HAVE A MIXED USE CODE IN THE DOWNTOWN COMMERCIAL AREA, IT WAS VOTED IN DURING A QUIET CITY COUNCIL MEETING IN jULY 2005 WHEN TORRES, MAURER, STOCKLEY, HAYES WERE IN THE COUNCIL, WITH NO ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT ADDRESSING TRAFFIC, PARKING ETC. YOU ARE RIGHT IT IS MIXED USE WHICH IS ALLOWED DOWNTOWN NOT STRICTLY RESIDENTIAL. SO THE RESIDENTIAL PART OF hOWIES AND SKILLED NURSING FACILITY(IF MIXED USE PUT IN ) HAS TO BE SET BACK 25 FT FROM EACH CORNER. WATCH THE PLANNING COMMISSION MEETINGS
    AND ANY MENTION OR SETBACKS AND REVERSE CORNERS. ON A CORNER THE NARROWEST PORTION IS CONSIDERED THE FRONT LOT LINE AND THE WIDEST THE SIDE LOT LINE. SO SNF'S FRONT LOT LINE IN ON HERMOSA AND THEIR REAT LOT LINE BACKS UP TO ARNOLDS HARDWARE OR THE TINY LOT NEXT TO ARNOLDS SIDE YD (REVERSE CORNER LOT). HOWIES MARKET NARROWEST PART OF THE LOT IS BALDWIN AVE & REAR LOT LINE BACKS UP TO THE PINK TWONHOMES SIDE YD (ANOTHER REVERSE CORNER LOT).

    AS FAR AS EAST MONTECITO(INDUSTRIAL AREA EAST OF BALDWIN) THAT AREA ON THE NORTH SIDE ADJACENT TO THE PARKING LOT WAS THE SITE PROPOSE FOR THE LOWER INCOME UNITS NEEDED TO OFF SET THE BUILDING OUT OF THE DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAN. SO THE EAST MONTECITO SPECIFIC PLAN WILL RAISE IT'S UGLY HEAD AGAIN???

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