Monday, July 23, 2012

Agenda Pants Briefs Sierra Madre On Tuesday Evening's Consent Calendar

The guy who usually writes up the Sierra Madre City Council meeting preview reports for this blog ran from his house screaming something completely unintelligible about 48 hours ago. We figure he'll eventually get hungry and return home, but it is no big loss if he doesn't. We'd call the Search and Rescue guys, but then it would invariably end up as one of the thousands of "hiker lost in the mountains" stories you see on Patch. And I am not sure anybody here has the strength to endure much of that anymore. I certainly know that I would find it to be difficult.

So instead this week's City Council preview article will be written by a pair of pants. Overalls to be exact. And while I am not certain these pants will be able to do as good a job as that other guy, I am also not sure anyone will notice. These things are all basically guess work as it is. Who really knows how these meetings will turn out?

This is a kind of a test, however. We're not going to turn the entire meeting preview over to a pair of pants. These matters are far too important for that. No, we're going to let him do the first part, at least through the end of the Consent Calendar. Tomorrow we'll tackle the much bigger subject of the Kensington/Measure V imbroglio. I don't think that one is over by any stretch of the imagination, despite what you might have heard. It deserves an entire post all to itself.

So without any further ado, take it away, Agenda Pants.

This meeting, like most others, opens with a "closed session" because various police officers, along with the Sierra Madre Police Officer's Association, are either suing the taxpayers, or threatening to sue them. This is what they usually do when they aren't asking us for higher salaries, benefits and money for their retirement. You really do have to be concerned about their sanity.

Once that little bit of work is complete the doors will open and the pilgrims allowed into Council Chambers to witness another bi-weekly session of the City's business. Mayor Josh Moran will lead the assembled in the Pledge of Allegiance, and then deliver either an invocation or an inspiration. This is where the Mayor either chooses to invoke God, or give the room a Babbitt-like pep talk. I believe it will have to be the latter by necessity. As many are aware, God no longer wishes to go into City Hall. And since He is the Almighty, that choice is His. Josh has no other option left but to try and cheer people up.

Next in view is the Consent Calendar, and this week there are 5 topics, each distinguished by its very own letter designation. All in the lower case. Letter "a" is naturally first, and that is because spending money is always the priority at City Hall. This week the lordly sum of $584,447.60 will disappear as if by magic. For each and every one of the myriad items both large and small that make up a city government there must be a corresponding check in the mail. Combine this meeting's portion with the other July spends of two weeks ago and you'll see that the City of Sierra Madre will have consumed $1,040,838 in 4 weeks. It is quite a feat.

The Consent Calendar item labeled "b" has to do with the paperwork involved in the hiring of three new Fire Captains. And there is always paperwork involved, and with legal terms to be defined as well. A bit of an optimistic move by the City if you think about it. Despite all the claims being made last April that a "no" vote on the UUT Measures would impoverish this little old town to the point of insolvency, it appears City Hall still has the ability to hire some folks to new positions. And if they are going to hire people for anything, it might as well be the Fire Department. There certainly is no better use for our tax money.

The next item is letter "c" (do you detect a pattern here?) and it has to do with rules for those submitting programming to SMTV3 for broadcast. Properly entitled "Channel Guidelines for Submissions," it details all of the exciting things you'll need to do to get your show before the dozens of rapt and loyal viewers of Sierra Madre's official government television station. Unfortunately, so far only one such show has been submitted.

There is also a lament here from City Staff that they somehow forgot to include the fee costs for submitting a show to SMTV3 on the City's official fee schedule. Which does bring up a sore point with me. How is it that we pay for such things as SMTV3 with our taxes, yet we'll be required to pay a second time in the form of fees should we actually want to make some use of it? That seems like double-dipping to me.

One more thing on Item "c," basically because now I am getting annoyed. There is an item in the guidelines that states the following about any submitted programming: "Must be non-partisan, non-political, non-commercial, and of community wide interest." How does that jibe with the Bill of Rights? And if you take all of those things out, what exactly is left? A TV show dedicated to the topic of watching grass grow?

Consent Calendar letter "d" has to do with the disposal of dangerous waste. The County of Los Angeles will be dispatching DPW guys in hazmat suits to Sierra Madre to pick up such life threatening items as brake fluid, paint and paint thinner, pesticides, old batteries, unconsumed drugs, anti-freeze, annoying relatives and more stuff like it. You cannot bring explosives, ammunition or radioactive waste to this event, however. Those items you either drive out to the desert and throw from your car window, or use for taking out stop signs and the mailboxes of those with whom you have political differences.

The City Council's job here is to decide where these fellows will set up shop to do their vital disposal work, and then TUP 'em. Last year they operated out of the parking lot somewhere behind The Bucchaneer. I went there and had an absurd experience. I pulled up to the guys in the hazmat suits and started to get out to unload all the stuff I'd stashed in my car trunk. But they wouldn't let me out of my car because it was "too dangerous." It didn't seem to occur to them that I myself had put that stuff in my trunk just an hour earlier, or that it had been sitting in my garage for the past few years.

The item designated as lower case letter "e" is with us for the purpose of selecting a full representative and an alternate as voting delegates at the Annual Conference of the League of California Cities, which is to be held in San Diego this year. Our liaison to this awful organization is Josh Moran, with the alternative being John Harabedian. So this Consent Calendar item is pretty much a formality, and deals with giving legal voting authority to the Mayor while at this conference.

Of course, if I was King I'd get our city out of this parcel of pottage. The only difference between "The League" and organizations like the California Association of Realtors or the Building Industry Association is that LoCC members don't believe that they should have to pay for their own drinks. That is what lobbyists are there for.

One last topic before we break for the day, and that is Item #2, which has what is certainly the most inadvertently humorous title of any recent City Council meeting agenda. A document not ordinarily noted for its humor, intentional or otherwise.

Public Hearing - Consideration Of Ordinance No. 1330 Adopting Chapter 1.14 Of The Municipal Code Regarding Public Nuisances, Code Enforcement Fees, And Attorneys Fees.

For once the agenda writer got it right, they really are all public nuisances. What this one is actually all about, however, is recovering the costs of enforcing City Codes, along with the legal expenses to the City that might be incurred. Should this new ordinance be approved the party that would have to pick up the costs involved in resolving such violation(s) would be the offending property owner rather than the City.

Which I guess would make sense, except for this one thing. Would the City begin to see this as another profit center, like traffic tickets? The one thing that holds City Hall back from overzealous Code enforcement today is, in my opinion, the expenses involved. It has to be a pretty serious deal before they'll lower the boom on some poor sap. But with the sap having to pick up all the expenses involved in the correction of his crime and exacting of his punishment, what is to prevent the City from launching a Code Enforcement Jihad? Particularly since they always seem to need more cash?

(Mod: That is it for today. Great work, Pants. Tomorrow we will pick it back up with the Kensington and Measure V matters. Together probably the most important issue that has come our way in quite some time.)

Extra: We have received word here at The Tattler that Bill Coburn, the longtime spokesperson for the Chamber of Commerce, will be leaving that organization at the end of this month. The reason is a financial one, the Chamber is suffering hardships and is having to make adjustments that reflect that condition. More on this story as it arrives.

http://sierramadretattler.blogspot.com

69 comments:

  1. Pay attention to Ordinance No. 1330 Adopting Chapter 1.14 Of The Municipal Code. This would mean that some city bureaucrat acts as judge, jury and executioner over some undefined "public nuisance" with no recourse to an impartial entity. Bikes in the front yard? Parties that run late? Haven't mowed the lawn in awhile, or, alternatively, let it go brown to save on water? (Something that's perfectly normal in the Pacific Northwest but frowned upon in tony places like Orange County, where there's a water shortage - go figure).

    There's the legality to this, too. Under state law, a case must be built with evidence of a long-term nuisance, as well as a danger to public safety. The item must go through the commissions for determination of the violation of the City Code, be approved by Council, forwarded to the City legal department for action by City and County departments. All with continuing dialogue with the resident. This is not something that can just be "billed out" to a PROPERTY OWNER because it has to be treated as a civil rights matter. It's not like a parking fine which occurs on public property.

    You see this kind of extreme resolution of serious public safety issues such as when a city gets involved with shutting down a crack house, for example, and abandoned properties. But there is always, always, process involved for this, and the public picks up the tab, unfortunately, because it's a defense of public health and safety. This should never, ever be targeted to residents on their own property, with the exception of minor fines to residents for noisy dogs and parties that exceed specified decibel levels, or costs to remove abandoned cars in front of the house, and so forth. This mechanism is already in place.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Bart Doyle for this enlightening piece on public nuisance property. Got your attendtion did it? Time to put those kids living at home to work in the yard and hire a house painter. Bart, this one's for you.

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    2. Just what Sierra Madre needs. An ordinance that allows the City to wage war on the residents. Anyone think they won't use it?

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    3. Bill Coburn, I like the man but I wonder if this is case of you reap what you sow? Birds of a feather flock together, Mosca, Coburn, Henderson, the list could go on and on.

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    4. Bill has taken some very partisan political stands over the years. I wonder if this doesn't indicate a recognition at the Chamber that his continued presence there is an alienating factor for many.

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    5. two years of rained out Wistaria Festivals, the Chamber office is currently being offered "for rent" - which must mean the Chamber offices are downsizing yet again. So is it any wonder that Mr Coburn might be "downsized" too?
      It is a shame the Chamber has not been able to be a relevant part of Sierra Madre and promoting the town's businesses.

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    6. I've been in that office - it's the side of a large closet!

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  2. interesting, I endured years of the howling blood hounds on south baldwin, but the owner was a tracker for the LASD, the dogs should have been in a kennel somewhere, complaining to the city did no good since he was a member of the establishment

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    1. Why didn't you complain to the Humane Society? That's where your complaint would be taken seriously and acted upon.

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    2. code enforcement would't do anything, all neighbors companied about the noise and he had more dogs than Sierra Madre allows, He was a LASD. moved away about 9 months ago.

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  3. I don't think the members of the Chamber give a s*** either way whether Bill is a paid employee. What they're looking for is new business! In spite of Walsh's mouthings of branding the town and Bill conjuring up roach coaches and Wistaria craziness the economy is dampening down new business. I just paid close to $20 of my hard earned dollars for a seasoning packet and onion confit as a hostess gift. Why? Because it had Sierra Madre on the label. Would I buy it for my personal pantry? No. The Chamber isn't producing for its members. The members aren't responding to the economic times. Bill, you should have jumped on the Save Taylor's band wagon!

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  4. Heavy-handed code enforcement would be hard on our seniors.

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    1. Steady code enforcement would help rid us of dumpy homes and dead automobiles.

      Sitting on a piece of valuable Sierra Madre real estate and letting it look like a piece of crap doesn't help anyone.

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    2. The Realtor dream running off all those seniors who are sitting on "valuable real estate." So who will sit in judgement of those people? Who gets entrusted with all of that power?

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    3. I'll be nominating that horrible looking piece of property on the corner of Mountain Trail and Grandview with the wild out of control cactic and weeds covering up the upainted ugly stucco box with trash overwhelming the side yard. Apparently the owner is a local celebrity of sorts and given some sort of dispensation for her habits because she's "artistic". Cite her. Get the place cleaned up.

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    4. Dumpy homes? 10:41 is a scary kind of neighbor.
      Lookie here, as long as someone complies with the health and safety codes so that there's no threat to others, they have a right to let their homes be as dumpy as they like.
      And not only that, but there are some people who live in Sierra Madre who don't have the money to be cosmetic.

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    5. You can bet that not only the local realtors but the City fathers will be jumping up an down with glee. If they can move the seniors out, they can turn those properties over and begin to collect the property tax they're always whining about. Most of the seniors bought prior to 1978.

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    6. I can see this serving a couple of purposes. It would help those interested in gentrifying Sierra Madre, turning it in something profitable for realtors and developers. The City could make a lot of money off of it, and you know they're leaving no stone unturned these days. Yep. About has contrary to Sierra Madre's traditions as you can get.

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    7. What about that purple monstrosity on the 29,000 sq ft lot on Orange Grove? The for sale sign long gone, an army of permanently stationed green waste bins, and a forest of dead and dying plantlife. That shouldn't be. No one who owns a property that visible should be allowed to leave it in such derelict condition.

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    8. Don't see much difference between what you describe and Enid Joffee's Goldberg Park debacle. Well, except that the City doesn't have to spend money to rake up the trash.

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    9. very hard on your seniors, they will start putting liens on their property. Perhaps even seizing it..Don't be too quick to allow them the opportunity;

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    10. Huh? That cactus patch house is one of my favorites. Much more appealing than the sterile grass lawns throughout town.

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    11. "We buy old homes".....

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  5. Dear Agenda Pants, this is off topic but I just saw the Canterbury Story today.
    I saw the picture of her comment but alas she seems to have moved it off the Patch and her facebook account. She does have a picture of a very sick little frizzle rooster, that needs dusting due to parasites and a very skinny dog, she seems to like the patch story and taverns. Anyway, here is the response I posted on the patch regarding her lower than low, dispicable, P O S comment.

    Delete Kim Goddard
    10:34 am on Monday, July 23, 2012

    Ms Canterbury, I understand you took exception to my nomination of John Crawford, I read the story today. However I cannot seem to find your comment here or on your facebook page. It is posted on the Tattler. I have several attorneys if you ever address a comment to me or call one of the most intelligent caring men in Sierra Madre vile again, you are going to meet them up close and personally. Vile is as vile does. Have a nice day.

    But hey Mr. Crawford got 4 votes,

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    1. Kim Goddard, I didn't know how to get ahold of you to tell you how proud I was of your nomination and all of the support you've given John Crawford and The Tattler over the last few years. If The Tattler was giving out prizes, you'd be at the top of my nomination list!

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    2. You're the greatest, Okie. Love it!

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    3. Great post! I notice Patch has deleted some readers' comments in response to the nomination press release. So much for free speech.

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    4. I just checked out the Patch.

      Boy, this economy is bad - Even Patch is losing (comments)!

      The jump page with the survey link says 21 comments. When you get to the page, there's 11. Tough crowd!

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    5. Speaking about bad economy, according to a May 31 article on Businessweek.com Patch lost $147 million for Aol in the last year. A disaster of the first magnitude.

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    6. Thank you to all above, The Crawford Family has my information, I was in a hurry this morning, John was wrong, He does deserve that nomination, the key word was volunteer in several of those awards. I went back and read the comments, you Tatts did a fine job retorting the retorter. You were there when I needed you, you saved my life. But maybe if John truly refuses to learn the Cha Cha then we should nominate Mrs. Crawford, raising a male specimen into a fine husband and most excellant writer, that is a lifetime acheivement..Proud to be a Tatt, proud to count you as friends. PS, god guided a young turkeyess into my yard, her name is Tattler Tursey.

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  6. SMTV3 programming "Must be non-partisan, non-political, non-commercial, and of community wide interest." Then it will have to stop airing all those ridiculous PR pieces for transit center high development, the ones that feature mayors of cities along the Gold Line.

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    1. Amen. Again this is another situation where City hwall determines what qualifies and what does not. They've turned SMTV3 into a propaganda outlet for SCAG housing.

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    2. A propaganda outfit indeed.

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  7. 626 Holly Trail is another eyesore and a potential hazard to the home below it. A Tim Hayden remodel disaster the foundation has been underminded by years of rain runoff and the massive blue tarp draped on the hillside is split and rotten. Deutche Bank, the current owner, has already been successfully sued by another property owner when a tree fell and did serious damage to his home. Sits on a hillside and the eroding dirt is covering the pedestrian path as well as filling up the backyard of houses lower on the hill.

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  8. Turn out tomorrow and demand the City Council get off their duffs and get Measure V on the November 6th ballot! that's been an eyesore for years.

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  9. Mr Pants did a fine "overall" job today. I guess he's a smarty-pants!

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  10. Let's just sure that the Measure V amendment is the one that is wanted and needed. It should be only to amend the density of the project from the two parcels.

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  11. The Chamber has not updated its website.
    Coburn is still listed under staff as Executive Director, but what really caught my eye was a major poison pill - Susan Harriet Poole Henderson is on the Board of Directors. No wonder they're a failure.

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    1. Matheson's name stayed on the Chamber site for weeks after his arrest was made public.

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    2. Maybe Henderson will become the new Executive Director and work out of her MtnViewsNews location. She'll be in the catbird seat!

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  12. Mr. Excitement will no longer be available to share all that charisma for the sake of getting more people into shops?

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    1. I wonder how much of the money story is true, anheir the actual version is more like what you are saying. The Chamber has had very little success in the last few years.

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  13. Here is what will be happening to Sierra Madre within the next 10 to 15 years starting with the next economic growth boom. Most of of the seniors or people who have been living in the mid-century small homes will be dead or living in an assisted living facilities. The Mur-Sol type contractors will be buying up and developing new McMansions on these old lots. White flight has been in the process in the San Gabriel Valley for the last decade. More Asian people are filling in those spots. They have new monies and want new homes. Within 25 to 30 years, I would guess that 50% of the existing homes built before 1960 will be demolished and new McMansions built on them. Sierra Madre as a city may go bankrupt in the near future and Arcadia or Pasadena annexes SM. If Arcadia does so the Asian population will tripe within this decade. Regardless, the Asian population will be increasing like we have never seen within this decade in any case. These figures are not for certain as I have not done a detailed analysis but are more of speculation. Through observation and analysis of the region for the last 10 years this appears to be the trend. Most of us will be 6 feet under as well or in our senior years. It is impossible and unnecessary for us to try to preserve a mid century life as the only thing that remains constant is change itself. New peoples coming from different cultures do not hold the same values as the baby boomer generation does. Neither good nor bad its just the way it is. Now is the time to stake your claim far east or far west of Los Angeles. In the end Sierra Madre will become a city only for the wealthy.

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    1. The one thing, the only thing, that has kept the Asian community from dominating Sierra Madre so far is the PUSD.
      Plus, I've heard, don't know if it's true, that there is bad feng shui living too close to mountains.

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    2. The biggest most expensive homes in Singapore are built in the hills...

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    3. Hills in Singapore? When were you there?

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    4. 12:33 is right, there are hills in Singapore at least as of 1999 when I was there. No mountains though. The hills are comperable to our foothills and, yes, there are homes built on the hills. Not that this matters a twit.

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    5. oops, misspell,misspell - comparable.

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  14. I never gamble on someone else's vision of the future, 12:08. The only thing we know for certain is now. Fight for today.

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  15. not my vision 12 17. Its just plain truth and fact. Once that Gold Line is completed traffic just down below us will get worse than it already is on Foothill. Look back only 10 years ago Foothill/Orange Grove and SMB. Now go there at 5 pm and see the blocks long traffic. With more people coming more change.

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    1. You sound like SCAG. They always howled about the millions on their way to California. Turned out there were millions moving, but it was away from here. You need to look at the census data. In the last decade Sierra Madre's population has barely budged. No matter how many cars you think you've seen. Sorry, but I don't believe you know what you are talking about.

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  16. You heard incorrectly. Fung soie . Living close to mountains is not bad luck. Chinese want to live on top of the world so to speak. Its a status symbol to be higher elevated than the rest. The chinese send their kids to private schools so PUSD means nothing. Just as it does to us. I sent my kids through High Point.

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    Replies
    1. Tell that to the Asian kids at Arcadia HS... but they do send their kids to tutors and music lessons, in addition to soccer, tennis, and golf.

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    2. You must have the proper relationship to the mountain - it needs to be behind your property, and you face open space in front. Open Space with water is best, but slim pickings in this part of the world.
      Mountain behind, air and water in front.

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    3. I heard it was the zip code - S.M. has unlucky numbers.

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  17. A true and a property threatening experience. 5 years ago, new neighbor moved in and starts to collect "things". Once the garage is full, (actually a pyramid of trash). it begins to spill out front on and under the front porch. Then to a wide backyard back yeard porch pad where it becomes the next trash depot full of used appliances and the like. Now the neighbor takes a fancy to a "Los Angeles Pumper Fire Truck" which he buys and locates in the front yard, next to the driveway. He then decides to install a round 30' 4' deep above ground pool in the back yard. Soon one of our Mt Wilson downpours causes the pool to rupture and spill its contents into our wooden fence, yard and the crawl space under our home. All along he has been taking in renters using his front yard for parking. You get the picture.

    I have a large file of letters and photographs of sights that would only be believed from actually seeing them. Another neighbor and I paid several visits to the City (Ciry Mgr refused to see us and sent us on to "code enforcement" Lisa Volpe who was of no help) Then letters to Coluntano Law Firm finally got us a response basically saying that the fire truck might be considered an "antique" and the City might lose a law suit and then suggested we the two residents on either side attempt to correct the code problems ourselves.

    Eventually the neighbor went into forclosure and the property was forceably cleaned up. It took: three men 3 days; 2 men 2 more days; 2 semi size dumpsters and under the trash pyramid in the garage over 500 galons of paint removed by hazmat workers.

    This deplorable condition was allow to fester for over 3 years. I do not wish on any of you a need to bring a code violation into complience. At least not counting on the City's assistance.

    Our new neighbors have been fabulous; spendinng cleaning and bringing the property to one of the best levels on our street. :)

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  18. Arcadia High School:

    African American: 49 (1.4%)
    American Indian: 3 (0.1%)
    Asian: 2488 (68.9%)
    Hispanic: 419 (11.6%)
    Pacific Islander: 2 (0.1%)
    Two or more races: 20 (0.6%)
    White: 629 (17.4%)
    Not Specified:0 (0%)

    San Marino High School:


    African American: 11 (1%)
    American Indian: 0 (0%)
    Asian: 710 (62%)
    Hispanic: 96 (8.4%)
    Pacific Islander: 2 (0.2%)
    Two or more races: 15 (1.3%)
    White: 312 (27.2%)
    Not Specified:0 (0%)

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  19. Hey, what's with the facts!? That's contrary to the national educational policy.
    Asians!? I don't see no Asians!

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    Replies
    1. It's not whether or not you "are" a disappearing minority, it's whether or not you "feel" like a disappearing minority.

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  20. When was the Fire Department called regarding the fire hazard for all the strored paint? I got rid of a shed, the paint and the shed, that was built on the property line of a neighbor (not even my direct problem) by calling the fire department in on the code violation. Illegal use of a structure (built without a permit) as commercial in a residential zone, ie paint storage. These 500 gallons of paint may not have been known about until the removal, that is true. What a mess to have to endure.

    Also, some people have been helped by their homeowner's insurance agent, contacting the same for the offending property and getting the problem solved with a visit from the other property's insurance agent. Also, the bank who has a long on the property does not want it to burn to the ground.

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  21. It does not matter what you think of the mix of kids in school/neighborhoods. It matters how they view one another...and what is taught in the home. And, actually youth, on the whole do not perceive the world the same. There are more mixed marriages than ever before and more mixed neighborhoods. Hurrah for being color, race and neighborhood blind. Maybe the Prince of Peace will have a greater effect....on racism, sexism, religion and hatred?

    Sally Ride just died: Women in Science and what they have done has a great impact on our youth. Must have been interesting to live next to her/go to school with her.

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  22. We are living in a global and multi-cultural society.

    Every teen knows that we are a keyboard away from one another and
    most are offended by anyone being kept apart because of color, culture
    or religion.

    Adults who don't get it are just left out.

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  23. Collecting and packing our car with dangerous stuff and not being able to get out of the car. Who writes safety rules?

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  24. 2:48, 2:55, what?

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  25. Here is all you need to know about P.E.G. (Public / Education /Government) TV


    http://www.millervaneaton.com/00142081.pdf

    Summary
    Public, educational, and governmental (PEG) access channels are those cable
    television channels that are set aside for use by the general public, by local schools,colleges, and universities, and by elements of local government. PEG access channels are not mandated by federal law. But the Cable Communications Policy Act of 1984 amended the Communications Act to explicitly allow cable franchising authorities to require cable operators to set aside channel capacity for PEG use and to provide adequate facilities or financial support for those channels. These PEG provisions have been a primary vehicle for fostering the long-standing U.S. media policy goal of localism on cable systems.

    Several recent developments appear to be affecting the amount and placement
    of channel capacity set aside for PEG use, the amount of financial support from cable providers for those PEG channels, and the technical quality of the PEG channels.
    In particular:

    In the past few years approximately 20 states have passed laws
    allowing cable systems to obtain state-wide franchises. There now
    is growing controversy about the extent to which, as a result of these
    laws, the PEG requirements that had been negotiated by local
    authorities are being legally or illegally abrogated.

    The FCC recently adopted rules that may limit the amount of PEG
    financial support that local franchising authorities can require of
    cable providers.

    AT&T has introduced its U-verse service, which provides multichannel
    video service using Internet Protocol (IP) technology. This
    service makes PEG channels available to subscribers in a fashion
    that some local jurisdictions and PEG programmers claim is inferior
    and discriminatory. AT&T responds that it is inappropriate to
    require it to deploy its IP network inefficiently in order to meet
    requirements developed for traditional cable architecture.

    As traditional cable providers are migrating from the analog
    transmission of PEG programming to digital transmission in order
    to conserve bandwidth for new high-definition and video-on-demand
    services, some subscribers are no longer able to receive the PEG
    programming or must obtain set-top boxes to receive that
    programming.
    The new state-wide franchising laws and recent FCC rules also are
    affecting the requirements for and funding of institutional networks
    that many local franchising authorities historically have required
    cable companies to construct or operate for educational or
    governmental use.

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  26. This is a great comedy blog!

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    Replies
    1. City government in Sierra Madre is a rich comedic resource.

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  27. 2:20 The paint along with other stuff was under a pyrimid 7'6" high wall to wall in a 2 car garage.

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