Saturday, November 3, 2012

Take the 2012 Los Angeles Urban County Housing and Community Development Survey!

Answer my questions, NIMBY.
Tucked inside the latest e-mail blast from the City of Sierra Madre is a survey from the Community Development Commission of the County of Los Angeles. And they have a couple of questions they want you to answer on the topics of housing and development. Those being, what exactly are your housing and development priorities for where you live? Inquiring bureaucrats need to know. After all, how else will they ever be able to claim that they have the support of persons such as yourself unless you answer their questions?

The pleasure of your response is most sincerely, and urgently, requested by them. Do not hesitate to share your opinions on these very important matters. The future of your County may depend on it!

Of course, the answers provided in this survey might not be the sorts of things that you would ordinarily choose for yourself. Maybe they are, I don't know. Mostly they appear to me to be slanted towards the sorts of things that they would prefer to see happen here. Such as low income and homeless housing smack dab in the middle of our downtown. They're sitting on a pot of your tax money and they do want to spend it, but they also want to make it seem that they are doing so with your blessing. And apparently there is little they won't stoop to in order to get it.

And how nice for them if they can also convince themselves that they're bettering the world at your expense? After all, they don't live here, so what could the possible consequences be for them? That certainly does seem to be the way things work in L.A. County.

As an example, here is the first question. "If you had funds to invest, how would you allocate your resources among these areas? Please express your answer in percentage terms. For example, 20 is equal to 20 percent. The sum should equal 100." Your choices are: Housing, Economic Development, Infrastructure, Public Facilities, Human Services, and Other.

Now none of those choices really break down what it is they are asking forr input on. Take housing for instance. Are they talking about Homeless Housing? Low Income Housing? McMansion Housing? Dog Housing? There really is a wide gamut of unspecified possibilities here, and do you really feel it is in your interest to give them an emotional blank check on what it is that you want for your city?

The answer I chose was Other. And in the space provided (Part 2 to Part 1 on Page 1) I spelled out what my wishes might be. That being the County should return all of the "funds to invest" to those they came from, the taxpayers. Because obviously these people have no idea what to do with them, why else would they be asking me? I certainly have some rather specific needs, and who better to spend my own money than myself?

The inquiry that I found to be the most enjoyable was contained on the page designated as #3. The question reading: "Below are barriers or constraints to the enhancement or provision of affordable housing. Please select the barriers or constraints that appear in Los Angeles County. Check all that apply."

The list of "all that apply" choices really is quite long, and a lot of them have to do with the realities of building houses. The cost of land is certainly an inconvenience, as are the costs of materials and labor. All are duly noted on the list. As are construction fees, permitting fees, and the "permitting process." I don't imagine they'd want you checking off those boxes down at City Hall. That is a cow of both the sacred and cash variety to them.

And also listed there is the name that most housing bureaucrats like to call those of us who attempt to stand in the way of their city wrecking. That being NIMBY. It does seem a bit ungrateful that they should be calling the taxpayers who help to fund their salaries and benefits such an unkind and pejorative name. But I suppose they do resent those who view them as being something other than the saviors of humanity. After all, just because they might want to drop a drug rehab facility right in the middle of a neighborhood where your children play doesn't mean you have a right to complain. You should show some gratitude to them for caring as deeply as they do.

Fortunately there is an "other" box, and they do invite you to specify. My answer was the "Community Development Commission of the County of Los Angeles." And no, I wasn't kidding. No, really.

If you wish to take this survey, you can do so by clicking here. Let these folks know what you think. Don't leave it all to the usual brown-nosers.

Vote "NO" on Measure J

I personally cannot imagine why anyone would vote for this thing. After Metro pretty much flat out lied to us about their desire to build the 710 Tunnel, and employed all sorts of deceptive marketing scams designed to help obscure their true designs here, we are now supposed to reward them by agreeing to a 60 year tax extension worth $90 billion dollars? That doesn't sound like much of a consequence to me.

A newspaper called the Beverly Hills Courier has a beautiful article on why you'd have to be some kind of nuts to vote for Measure J. Entitled "Vote 'NO' on Measure J - It Cheats All Of Us," they really lay down some cogent arguments for opposing this mess. Some of this is specific to that celebrated community, but I think you will get the point. Check this out:

Measure J is the latest sleight-of-hand trick that L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, L.A. County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky and local Assembly-man Mike Feuer have come up with to give MTA a blank check to the tune of $90 billion over 60 years, and taxing those yet to be born.

Measure J burdens us with higher sales taxes until 2069. It extends Measure R, passed four years ago with many promises–all broken. This is a tax on your children, grandchildren and on your great grandchildren for transportation projects that will likely be obsolete or not meet their needs. How could any logical voter, especially one who resides in Beverly Hills, owns real estate or businesses here, seriously consider voting for J, giving a blank check to the very agency that the Beverly Hills Unified School District and the City of Beverly Hills are suing for using its tax monies to run roughshod over this community?

Metro desperately wants Measure J. Why? Because Villaraigosa and Yaroslavsky are searching for their legacy as their time in public office comes to an end.

Their grandiose rail projects are all way over budget. Not one gets you to any airport in the Los Angeles area–not LAX, not Burbank, not Long Beach, not Ontario. How do you spend $90 billion and not even go to an airport?

When Measure R was put to the voters in 2008 and barely passed, the duo promised billions in matching federal funds. No matter how many times the mayor of L.A. goes to D.C. and lobbies furiously up and down the halls of Congress, he cannot find more federal funds for these projects. Metro wants $50 billion more in local funding to deliver less than what was originally promised.

The program is not moving forward. It is not moving anywhere. That is the legacy these politicians face without Measure J.

Who wins if Measure J passes? JMB, Century Plaza, Westfield, Parsons Brinkerhoff, AEG, and any other friend of Villaraigosa or Yaroslavsky who feed at the public trough.

Who loses if Measure J passes? We do. The black community loses. The Latino community loses. The San Fernando Valley. The San Gabriel Valley. In fact, the entire county of Los Angeles loses. We will be stuck forever with one plan and no more money–and that plan fails utterly to provide for regional and local transportation needs.

“No On J” is sending a message to the powers that be that corporate welfare, crony capitalism and back room deals are not acceptable.

You can access all of it by clicking here. And please do remember, giving Metro $90 billion dollars that your grandchildren not yet born will be forced to pay for is hardly the way to stop the 710 Tunnel. Don't vote against your own interests, and don't enable Metro to destroy our little slice of the world.

http://sierramadretattler.blogspot.com

56 comments:

  1. may not come as a surprise, or even a concern to many, but i have spent most of my life wandering in and out of the hollywood palladium. i doubt the lease that live nation has on it will matter, and if it survives that fifteen year lease, i will be surprised.

    http://la.curbed.com/archives/2012/11/hollywood_palladium_sells_amid_luxury_tower_rumors.php#reader_comments

    710 connector should serve its purpose well, getting everyone over to the new mega theaters downtown that sit vacant most of the year.

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  2. Just took the survey. I have one question for them - Why is government in the development business?

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  3. I suggested that a real good way to reduce the tax shortfall in our area would be to disband their Commission. There really is no use for them.

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  4. Can't you just imagine some obnoxious fool from this commission standing at the podium reciting the figures from this survey that suit his purposes? I can't stand these people.

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  5. I have come to the conclusion that the Mob or something like it controls access to airports in Los Angeles. As the Courier points out, even with billions over decades, there will not be a public transportation ride to the airports. There has got to be an explanation for this, and what could it be besides the breaking of knees or other acts of violence, or the threats thereof, in certain planning meetings?
    It is a marvel that in LA, there is no direct, publicly supported transportation to any of the airports.

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    1. I agree. When it comes to corruption there is no city that surpasses Los Angeles. We are the Cook County of the west.

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    2. The lack of direct service to the airports is an example of the anti-common sense that characterizes so much of municipal and county government. Buses or other forms of transportation that made direct runs to and from the airports could make a good amount of money. Won't happen.

      Besides, the system in place now, for only 1 of our airports, LAX, just adds 2 hours to your travel day, and involves a refreshing 1/2 mile to a mile walk.

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    3. Walking is green. LAX is a walkable airport. There is a lot of walkability in North Korea, too.

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    4. North Korea's army goose-steps. Is that green?

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  6. I hope everyone takes the survey. We don't need the homeless etc and the problems that would come with it.

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    1. Why don't San Marino and La Canada have homeless shelters?

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    2. A number of reasons. One of them is that a lot of the people who work in those city halls also live in that city. Here we have a bunch of out-of-town salaried people more aligned with county bureaucracies than they are with the people who pay their salaries. The county wants to build a homeless shelter here? Our salaried employees can't work hard enough to make it happen. Because that is who they answer to.

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  7. what happened at Enid Joffe's house last night. Anyword on who the special people were that attended.?

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    1. About a dozen cars were parked out in front at 8. If Holden rode up Michillinda he would have seen about 30 Lowe signs. The only two Holden signs were in front of Enid's house, obscured by the bushes. Obviously Holden's big supporters in town have barely lifted a finger for him. He stands no chance of carrying Sierra Madre. None.

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    2. Unless the meeting was elsewhere.
      If I saw the Tattler bust an invitation wide open like that, I would have been very busy phoning everyone and rearranging the time & place because of "unwanted public attention."

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    3. Nah, it was there. His supporters in town are slunk. The Holden campaign has no energy. They thought that Assembly seat was his by royal right. After all Holden is the heir of an LA political dynasty. He deserves to lose.

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  8. Photo up on FB today of that meeting with Chris Holden and Carol Liu and a few people sitting on the couches.

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    1. 200 people emailed, less than 20 showed up.

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    2. word is that sierra madre elementary's favorite parents flyered the twelve cars on the street with CENSURE HONOWITZ flyers.

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    3. Party seemed pretty quiet.

      http://www.facebook.com/holdenforassembly

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    4. That is good news, 12:07. That means those who attended got something of value out of it after all.

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    5. I shared my sadness on Holden's Facebook page for not being invited to the party. Boo hoo :(

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    6. Not sure if Canterbury can read those flyers, were there pictures?

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    7. Her copy was written in glitter ink.

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    8. Enid is showing some major gam action in that one shot. Looks like she put on her Friday night skirt.

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    9. Maybe she wanted to be a Chris Miss.

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    10. the cantaloper (is that what you call that car?) received one with a mr. ed puppet picture

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    11. She can't elope. She's already taken.

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  9. The FB pix shows 8 people and the person holding the camera.

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    1. 2 of them are the candidates themselves.

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    2. Comes with the gig. Sometimes there are adoring crowds, sometimes a couple of lookie-loos. The pitch stays the same either way. But I wouldn't want to be the campaign meet & greet organizer who has to take the blame for the poor turn out.

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    3. You get a State Senator and an Assembly candidate to your house you have got to have people there. The Dems in Sierra Madre are falling apart. No signs anywhere, and a former Mayor can't get anymore than a handful of people out. Pretty pathetic.

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    4. Looks like the years of lying have finally caught up with them.

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    5. The Dems in Sierra Madre are not falling apart! I am a life-long Dem, but will not vote for Holden. Certain so-called Democratic leaders, such as Bart Doyle (former Republican who was rejected by his party in his bid for state office) and others, shows that it is and can be all over the place when it comes to you thinking you see a strong or weak push at the "party" level when these issues (the 710 freeway extension) are non-partisan.

      I am voting NO on the Kensington, Measure J and 32 but yes on 30 and 37--so as far as I can see I will be voting the same as some of my Republican friends and the same as some of my Democratic friends. It is American don't forget.

      Oh and Obama, because he really represents me--my mother was a White Mid-Western Woman, too, and I approve of the Democratic platform.

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    6. Don't kid yourself. Some of those invited are Tattler readers ( maybe even Josh?) and they couldn't take the heat.

      Well done, Crawford!

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    7. The Dems in Sierra Madre aren't falling apart! Colin has the chair of the LA Democratic Party do a robocall

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    8. The Dems in Sierra Madre are so bad I left the party.

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  10. Ex mayor Joffe is wearing a mini-skirt.

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    1. Where did they hide the booze?

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    2. Where was Bart?

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    3. Bart is in the back of the picture with a lampshade on his head.

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    4. Oh. And here I assumed it was Josh.

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  11. 2 robo calls this morning for Measure J. One from a Fire Department Chief, one from Magic Johnson.

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    1. This Measure J extension has to pass with 2/3s of the vote. It barely made it through the first time. I'm not so certain the mood of the electorate is quite so sunny right now.

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    2. But if you vote for Measure J, it'll cost less than a cup of coffee a day!

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    3. $90 billion dollars based on sales tax collection. The geniuses at Metro will borrow against that sum so the can finish projects like the subway to the sea. Once that borrowed money is gone all that will be left is 50 some odd years of debt payments. Sound familiar? Somebody needs to check Metro's Board of Directors. I'll bet you see Bart Doyle's name in there somewhere.

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  12. The water use of the assisted living is presented as being minor.
    Wonder what the use is like in similar sized businesses already up and running?
    Don't recall that our city staff or the developer supplied that info at the public hearings.

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  13. Why We Miss MaryAnn # 1,231

    Sierra Madre is bringing on board the biggest water user in it's history at a time when we are within a year of running out of water.

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  14. Big thank you to whoever took it upon themselves to get out there and do the hard work of flyer distribution.

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  15. The biggest water user in the history of Sierra Madre is my daughter - I am sure of it. Those long showers...

    But all kidding aside, old people don't bathe that often. And they don't have a bunch of kids who need 10 loads of laundry done every week. I've also noticed that old people turn off the water when they're scrubbing their dentures, and they remember to turn off the lights. Just sayin"

    So, I wonder how much it costs to water the lawns of the parks, or the school properties. Or how about that low income housing building on Esperanza. I think there are a lot of big water users in town - so what's with the hyperbole about the ALF being "the biggest water user in it's history." And, who's to say that any other development on Fountain Square's personal property wouldn't use lots of water.

    I'm voting for our vast aging population and the need for exactly this type of home for them.

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    1. I think a lot of it has to do with the ALF being the biggest water user in town. While it is true the old folks won't be bathing so much, can you say the same for their sheets and towels? I believe that the necessity for repeated cleanings of those items can be noted without going in to any detail, right? Plus can you identify any other place in town where so many people will live within so small an area? Complete with a restaurant sized kitchen, laundry facility, and constant cleaning? It is going to take a lot of water to keep God's Waiting Room afloat. You're just going to have to accept that.

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    2. Stop with the "it's good for the elders" !! That is an incorrect perception.
      This is NOT the kind of facility that is good for the elders. Ask any nurse. Ask any gerontologist.
      A facility with 3 levels of care (independent/assisted/skilled nursing) is best, but at least find assisted/skilled nursing for any elder you care about.
      The Kensington kind is the most expensive and the most prone to corruption of staff. Much better to hire in home care until the skilled nursing facility is needed.

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    3. if that monstrosity is built- and i am betting it will- it will likely be the single biggest mistake the city ever makes. if it fails as a assisted living facility, and i predict it will, then it is only a matter of time before it becomes adjusted to be simply a living facility (thus ALF will always be its acronym). it will also be the focal point of the boulevard of broken schemes, and pave the way for another megapolis, most likely on baldwin and sm blvd..... walk the parameter of that vacant facility property and tell me i'm wrong. it's going to be huge....... i mean, i generally avoid that whole part of town anyway, choosing alternate streets to drive wrecklessly on, so i will generally miss that behemoth in the future as i avoid it now, but once built, that carbunkle ain't never gonna be lanced

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