Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Former Sierra Madre City Manager John Gillison's Rather Hard Nosed Affordable Care Act Cost Solutions

.
Sierra Madre's previous City Manager was John Gillison. He was a man much beloved by our City's chronic political establishment, and when the time came for him to depart there was much sadness upon the land. Here is some of the glowing testimony about John to be found on a blog called inSierraMadre.com (link). Something that no longer exists, though its remnants can still be found on the Internet.

Mayor John Buchanan said, "It is with great sadness that we accept John's resignation. He has been an extraordinary leader of our City and a tireless public servant. He has been instrumental in shaping Sierra Madre's future and moving us forward into the 21st century, achieving measurable results, and focusing on what's best for our community. John possesses the combination of experience, enthusiasm and management ability that has served the City and the community above all of our expectations. We all wish him well and know he will be successful in all of his future endeavors."

"I believe Sierra Madre has had one of the best City Manager's in its history," Mayor Pro Tem Enid Joffe said. "John has always approached his duties with a combination of integrity, knowledge, leadership, vision, passion, creativity, urgency, and plain hard work. Together with the members of his department, to whom he is always quick to credit, he has constructed a modern, problem-solving work force that is second to none."

This inSierraMadre.com article also lauded some of Gillison's achievements while serving as Sierra Madre's City Manager.

Since joining Sierra Madre in 2005, John has been responsible for implementation of the City's paramedic program, the purchase of a new community pocket-park envisioned by the City for over 20 years, arranging the purchase of the Sierra Madre Community Nursery School property by the School and the construction of the City's first Senior Housing Project.

I believe it was also around this time that Sierra Madre became an All America City, an achievement that is still celebrated on the City of Sierra Madre's website, its stationary and official documents, plus small signs around town. It was also during his relatively brief tenure that the Downtown Specific Plan was hatched, an event that later led to Measure V and downtown land use arrangements that still enrage some while delighting others. Obviously John Gillison left a significant mark on this town.

On March 30, 2007 Gillison left our town to become the Deputy City Manager of Rancho Cucamonga. Later, upon the retirement of the City Manager there, John stepped up to assume the responsibilities of the position. He now runs that city on behalf of its elected officials, who come and go.

So I cannot help but wonder what our former Mayors cited above would care to think of John Gillison's rather hard nosed solution to budgeting for part time employee health care costs in Rancho Cucamonga. Even though Sierra Madre has its own miserly arrangements for part time employees, I am not certain that such labor friendly politicians as John Buchanan and Enid Joffe would ever approve of using hours cutting Wal*Mart style tactics were they ever proposed here.

Check this out from the Daily Bulletin (link):

Rancho Cucamonga may reduce part-time hours to avoid health care costs The new city budget proposal for the coming year recommends reduced hours for part-time employees in order to avoid additional healthcare costs associated with a new federal health care requirement under the Affordable Care Act.

In order to meet the requirement, the city would have to provide a benefit of $400 per month to employees who work 30 hours or more and potentially an additional group who work between 26 and 30 hours per week. Cost of funding health care under the new mandate for the city could be as high as $355,000 annually, according to the report.

Penalty for the city not paying the health care cost is estimated at about $940,000.

As an alternative, city manager John Gillison's budget proposal recommends the reduction of most part-time employee hours below the minimum average of 30 hours per week and hiring new part-time employees to make up for the lost labor. Cost for this plan is estimated at about $155,000.

"It will cost us a little bit more, but that's cheaper by a significant amount than paying for the health care costs," said Gillison.

Somehow I do not think Mayor Nancy Walsh or Mayor Pro Tem* John Harabedian will be inviting John Gillison here to speak about his health care cost solutions anytime soon.

More stuff from inSierraMadre.com

I had forgotten all about iSM.com until I stumbled across it late last night looking for material about John Gillison. There are some rather poignant things to be found on that site. This from March 4, 2007:

Recall Update Sierra Madre Councilman Joe Mosca filed an answer, as required by law, to a recall notice delivered to him Sunday, Feb. 18, during his “office hours” in Kersting Court.

He delivered his formal response to City Clerk Nancy Shollenberger and petitioner Leslie Hinton on Thursday, March 1, the same day the recall notice was published in the town’s paper of record, MVN News.

He said at the City Council meeting Feb. 27 that the allegations in the notice of were “meritless.” More than 100 people stood silently in support of him.

In his formal reply, he spelled out the reasons the claims in the notice had no basis.

“I supported and still support a public vote on the Downtown Specific Plan (DSP). In fact, the City Council voted unanimously to support my resolution calling for more public input and a public vote in November after the DSP is complete. An initiative interrupted that process, and now a recall could appear on the November ballot instead of the DSP.

“I continue to support responsible development and oppose overdevelopment. While I am one of the three newly elected council members, I vote independently after thoroughly studying the issues, listening to all sides and working through the information in discussion with fellow council members.

“I also volunteer in many local events and participate in community affairs beyond our borders. For example, as the City’s member of the Metropolitan Transit Authority, I fought and won the battle to save our bus service from cuts. During my tenure, the City has successfully lobbied for more funds and grants, and pushed for the first financial audit in three years. In addition, we now have paramedic services, stronger protection of our hillside and an emergency layer of protection for our water services.

“I have kept my campaign promise to work to preserve Sierra Madre and I will fight recall.”

Proponents now have 10 days to file the proposed recall form with the city clerk. She and the city attorney have another 10 days to approve the form before collection of signatures can begin. If successful, the recall would be on the ballot in November 2007.

Memories. Nobody could ever lard out freshly distilled bull quite the way Joe did.

Come to think of it, has anybody seen Joe lately? Shouldn't he still be around here somewhere, working just as hard as ever to "preserve Sierra Madre?"

Somebody check Bean Town.

http://sierramadretattler.blogspot.com

40 comments:

  1. In the end Joe Mosca recalled himself.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The recall was a failure and didn't he win the next election

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't seen him at any city council meetings lately. Has he been on vacation?

      Delete
    2. I saw Joe Mosca's picture on a milk carton the other day.

      Delete
    3. Joe won the next election.

      Delete
    4. And then he went away. Quite a mysterious thing I must say.

      Delete
    5. That 2nd election you mention, didn't Joe Mosca kick that off at what's his names house, the guy Josh Moran said he didn't know, you know,

      Delete
    6. We had a vote on the DSP. It was called Measure V.

      Delete
    7. Joe won because his supporters, the DIC, BIA, Realtors etc. got organized and voted for him, people who want to preserve Sierra Madre had better get to the poles and fight back!

      Delete
  3. Chris Koerber is Joe Mosca. MPT* told him that during the reorganization meeting when Johnny claimed the MPT* position.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, occasionally the white collar defense atty seeps through MPT's* placid valley boy exterior. His grilling Monday night of John Cappocia over his reluctance to support maximum water rate increases was not especially civil. It was a tell. Johnny must want to sell more water bonds a lot.

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    3. Mod ~ curious as to why...

      Delete
    4. Family is off limits. If you have some information backing up what you'ver said here e-mail it to me and I will look it over. There are two sides to the anonymous posting thing. You can pretty much say what you want about elected officals and their policies. What you can't do is anonymously knock someone's family. Hard fast rule here.

      Delete
    5. Thank you for the replay

      Delete
    6. I don't think Johhny Process was grilling John C. as much as JP doesn't understand why the City can't just charge the top rate. Kinda like Josh's "its only $20 a month" remark.

      Delete
  4. You forgot to add hillside development to Gillison's credit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No wonder John Buchanan had a bromance with this guy.

      Delete
  5. Can someone explain the 109% UUT on water that was used in a post yesterday when compairing SM water to other neighboring cities.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a way of doing the calculation. Mathematically it is correct. Instead of adding the cost of the bill plus the 9% UUT, you multiply by 109%. 100%= bill 9% = the UUT.

      Delete
  6. I think they meant 9%, since that is the current rate. The "reduced rate" on the water is what some council members say is because of the hefty increase in the water rate itself.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. One thing you know, the ask is always for more.

      Delete
  7. I'm sure I heard Elisa Cox answer Chris Koerber that the part time people are kept under 30 hours a week to avoid benefits.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Case #GC048115 probably why their asking for money!?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Is that the Hildreths? I hear that hit could be huge if the city loses.

      Delete
    2. You mean when.

      Delete
  9. Of course Enid liked John Gillison. he helped to make Goldberg Park a reality. That useless park was created from a major back room deal so that Enid's relatives (Roberta Goldberg) could get a great tax written off and Mayor Enid would have her name on a park in town. it was a total scam.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The City paid top dollar plus for that land. The Goldbergs gave only $10,000 of their $500,000+ windfall and had the park named after them. The park is a joke.

      Delete
    2. It was cozy in this town back then. Friends helped friends.

      Delete
    3. My question about Goldberg Park is how do you tell the difference between California Native Plants and the things that just kind of grow wild in an empty lot?

      Delete
  10. How did ghe Goldberg's get a tax write off if they were paid $800,000.00 +/- for the lot that became Goldberg Park? The name is the scam, too. Why would you name some thing as if it were commemorative when it was not donated?
    When, in fact, you were paid "fair" market value for the lot. Bogus all the way around. Primarily is was nespotism at its worse.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Rancho Cucamonga is what downtown Sierra Madre would look like now if Measure V had failed.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Actually as a plant palette Goldburg Park is ok. It is weedy looking and what southern California would like if we just got out of the way. That was the plan. Also known as California Native Plants. As a "park" is probably is not what most in Sierra Madre would find that useful since we have Bailey Canyon natural park areas and the same plant group on the Mt. Wilson Trail. But folks don't want noisy stuff in their "neighborhoods" either, you know, swings, slides, picknic tables, garbage cans and god forbid, toilets!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's good, but there is an entire national forest just above us filled with the same things. A much bigger pocket park.

      Delete
    2. I resent that damn pocket park because of the money. And the fraud of it's being named after people who did not donate it.

      Delete
    3. What is with that big sign they have in the park?

      Delete
  13. Rancho Cucamonga has a downtown? Wouldn't that just be a collections of mini malls on congested corners? You're not thinking of Victoria Gardens something or another. Sure there is a Main Street, main street in the mall without a roof. Puke!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are strategically placed strip malls with one or two three story buildings thrown in. All done so that you will walk to shop rather than drive. It is all written up on the SCAG site.

      Delete

The Tattler is a moderated blog. Annoying delays when posting comments can happen. Thank you for your patience and understanding.