Thursday, April 2, 2015

Arcadia Passes An Ordinance Protecting Sycamore Trees, So Naturally Sycamore Trees Are Being Cut Down

Almost a week ago, Friday afternoon to be exact, people in the Arcadia Highlands area heard the sound of trees being cut down. The address where all of this was happening was 1243 Highland Oaks, which is where you will find a single story home on a large lot. A prime candidate for just this kind of thing.

Word got around the area and the handful of individuals who are running the organization that is attempting to save this highly at-risk neighborhood were notified. The sound of trees being cut down has become common in the area, and often serves as an indication that further mansionization will soon be underway. People there now recognize this as a sign of bad things to come, and feel it in the pits of their stomachs.

The property at this particular address was home to five mature sycamores. Recently the Arcadia City Council, after a long and unexplained delay, had finally passed an ordinance protecting just these kinds of trees. By doing so sycamores joined oaks as a protected variety of trees in the community.

There was only one catch. This new ordinance protecting sycamores did not go into effect until the following week. Which has caused a flurry of activity in certain mansionization circles there.

The tree remover indicated to those who had stopped by to witness that the homeowner wanted to build a new two story home at this address. Therefore he decided to remove all of those trees now while he could before the new ordinance protecting sycamores went into effect.

Five sycamores in total were removed, along with a pine tree and a eucalyptus. One of the sycamores had a beehive in it. So the damage was not just limited to the actual destroyed trees.

That is how things seem to work in Arcadia these days. News of an ordinance to protect sycamores is received by the McMansion crowd as an indication that they need to cut them down as quickly as possible. Which, of course, they are more than eager to do.

Nobody has seen any plans for a new two story home at this address. At least not yet. To the best of anyone's knowledge the City has not received plans for any new structures at this address, either. Upon a complete submission of plans, all HOA members and the 12 homes in the notification area will get notice of any hearing set for review of this new home.

Here are the before, during and after photos of what happened at 1243 Highland Oaks.


sierramadretattler.blogspot.com

52 comments:

  1. Does anyone know why the ordinance protecting sycamores in Arcadia took as long as it did?

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  2. Does anyone remember the beautiful oak in the Ralph's parking lot? There one day and gone the next. Does anyone know why?

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    1. It died, sorry.

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    2. The cause of death was buzz saw and chipper poisoning.

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    3. it had root rot. http://patch.com/california/arcadia/what-happened-to-the-old-oak-tree-in-the-ralphs-parking-lot

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    4. Root rot. A lot of that going on in Arcadia.

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    5. Patch? I thought Patch died. Is this a zombie Patch?

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    6. All trees that get cut down in Arcadia have root rot. No, really!

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    7. Mur-sol made a mistake, thought that was where their next McMansion was going..........

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    8. the tree really did die, maybe it got some of Sierra Madre's yellow water.

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    9. Ralph-a-Lot Country Luxury Estates.

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    10. Good point, 7:44. Blue Tree Syndrome.

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    11. so much root rot during a drought

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    12. Did they get a second opinion?

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    13. http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/disease/root-rot-in-garden-plants.htm
      What is Root Rot?
      Root rot is a disease that attacks the roots of plants growing in wet soil. Since the disease spreads through the soil, the only root rot remedy for garden plants is often to remove and destroy the plant. However, you can try these corrective measures if you want to attempt to save a particularly valuable plant:
      Keep the soil as dry as possible.
      Don’t irrigate the plant unless the soil is almost completely dry.
      Pull back the soil to allow moisture to evaporate from the soil.

      Root rot in a drought. Good going, Patch.

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    14. That great tree was clearly sick. Efforts were made to save it.

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    15. Misdiagnosing the problem as root rot (and in a drought no less!) probably didn't help. Which tree expert was used, Moe, Larry or Curly? Maybe I'll take a look for myself on my way to Pavilions.

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    16. The root rot described above in 8.05 is probably Phytophthora Infestans. Common in seedlings.
      In a mature trees there are other more likely diseases. Requires expert diagnosis .

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    17. That tree was definitely dead.

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  3. Ralph wanted firewood to burn during his rain dance?

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  4. Thoughtful of the Arcadia City Council to give their more privileged constituents some warning time.

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  5. Such foolishness to chop down trees. They provide shade as well as habitat, let alone great beauty.
    This is the kind of move that makes you think our species is just too stupid to make it.

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  6. The oak at Arcadia Ralphs was poorly maintained over the years. Asphalt parking lot all around to heat the area and the massive amount of rocks on the nearby surface. I stopped by one day when the gardeners had a hose running onto the rocks and told them to turn off the water. Then unneeded, now people need to do some supplemental watering of their oaks to help in the drought.

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  7. Nothing special about the removal of these trees.

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    Replies
    1. It takes a special kind of soullessness to be able to say something like that.

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    2. 8:07 needs a chill pill

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    3. 11:46 needs to lay off the gin.

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  8. As far as cutting down trees far in advance of pulling permits for a construction project: nothing new in the world of building. They knew the existing trees would hamper their design. I am surprised Arcadia ever got around to protecting oaks, much less sycamores, after the long, futile battle over the oak/sycamore woodland at the settling basins there a few years back.

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  9. Look for the Western Sycamore, Plantanus racemosa, which is the species we have here in California. The Plantanus occidentals is in the southeast. Those were magnficent native trees, and the original ranch house (soon to be razed) was built to the side of those trees with great respect. Such respect is long gone in the building frenzy in the Highland Oaks. One of the side streets along there is Sycamore. What a loss!

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  10. Jared Diamod posits the question in Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed,
    what was the person who cut down the last tree on Easter Island thinking?

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    Replies
    1. he thought, "That will make room for my McMansion"

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    2. "If I don't build a fire to cook my food I'll starve."

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  11. Beware the "Root Rot" canard. It is a favorite of 'Arborists' in the pay of Developers or Cities.
    Few Arborists would know enough mycology to correctly identify a potentially lethal infection. City of Sierra Madre has used such excuses conveniently delivered by Western Arborists to fell nuisance trees. The ploy fell apart when I questioned the so called Arborist who delivered the death sentence. I challenged him to show one symptom of root rot. He could not.I asked him what mycological symptoms he was looking for when he declared root rot.He was clueless. I showed him how to find the mycelia and fruiting bodies. He was clueless.
    The tree was a nuisance tree- stupidly chosen & planted in the wrong place decades ago .But it certainly was not dangerous because of root rot.Once the tree is felled and the stump ground down, of course rot may eventually appear in the remaining dead stump.
    The sycamores are non-native and consume a lot of water.They are also huge. Often a poor choice in cramped locations but magnificent in the right situation. Let's hope they replace with more appropriate choices. But more important, tell the truth about why a tree has to be felled. Don't lie using pseudo mycology.

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    1. I think you meant to say eucalyptus trees are non-native, right?

      Wikipedia:
      Platanus racemosa is a species of Plane tree known by several common names, including California sycamore, Western sycamore, California plane tree, and in Spanish Aliso. Platanus racemosa is native to California and Baja California, where it grows in riparian areas, canyons, floodplains, at springs and seeps, and along streams and rivers in several types of habitats.

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  12. Look at all the slum areas of Los Angeles....one big common denominator..........very few trees.......
    This is just terrible and will eventually turn this area into something no one wants.
    Save trees, you fools! !!!!

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  13. Arcadia has adopted a scorched earth McMansion policy towards anything that moves. All they want are their development impact fees so they can fatten their bunnies and pensions. No matter how many things must be killed to make that happen.

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  14. It'll be amazing if there are any Sycamores left by next week!

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  15. There is a sycamore tree, as a city planted parkway tree, that was used a lot in the past, some are downtown Sierra Madre, London Plane Tree. Not sure, but probably of European origin. The Western Sycamore needs lots of space and is naturally given to a sideward lean.

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  16. I think Arcadia's goal is to end up looking the the city in the "Lorax" movie. Fake trees, same houses etc.

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  17. Where is Daryl Hannah when you need her?

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    Replies
    1. The drought has been murder on mermaids. I think she went back east.

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  18. No great loss for these particular trees.

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    Replies
    1. Would you feel the same if 4 or 5 McMannies were razed?

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  19. When the trees are are gone and the mc mansion is built the only landscaping will be a lone Sego Palm and a couple of Kumquat Trees with the rest of the front yard to become a gated huge apron drive way so the classless new-moneyed can show off all their white euro trash cars .
    P.S. Can anyone explain why the Mc Mansion set hate trees and nice landscaping ?

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    1. I'm not sure those things are hated, or just not thought of at all.
      Maybe a MacMansion type of person just wants to dominate every inch he or she can - kind of an ultimate insecurity.

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  20. think of all the trees they felled to build the canyon back in the day. don't fall for the slow-news-day alarmist nonsense

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    1. They didn't cut down everything when the Canyon was built, Boob the Builder. Nor did they build McMannies. That is the point. Arcadia is being clear cut.

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  21. Arcadia (Also Arcady) From Arcadia, pastoral region of ancient Greece regarded as a rural paradise...a usually idealized region or scene, - From Websters Third International Dictionary.

    Perhaps worth reviewing and remembering this?

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    Replies
    1. Arcadia will become an ironic use soon.

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    2. Use quotation marks. "Arcadia."

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