Thursday, May 7, 2015

Mater Dolorosa Developer New Urban West Calls It Quits

The dream is over.
Just about a year ago today we first heard about New Urban West and their hope of being the developer that would soon build 50 some odd 3,999 square foot homes on a large swathe of untouched and pristine property at the Mater Dolorosa Monastery. Here is how this vital information was first revealed to us as part of the May 23rd, 2014 edition of the always informative City Manager's Report, via The Tattler (link).

UPDATE REGARDING MATER DOLOROSA PASSIONIST RETREAT CENTER
Jerry Pearson, Cameron Thornton, and representatives from New Urban West met with City staff this week regarding their future plans for the development of the lower portion of the Mater Dolorosa property into single-family residential development. They informed staff that an agreement has been signed with New Urban West to develop the site, and that New Urban West will begin “due diligence” starting in June, and will begin community outreach in June - meeting with neighbors door-to-door, contacting stakeholders as well as Planning Commissioners and City Councilmembers to introduce themselves. New Urban West anticipates an application submittal by Fall of this year.

I am not sure how well the community outreach that was planned to begin last June went, but perhaps the results were not as kindly received as New Urban West had hoped. Of course, it could also be they walked away due to the water moratorium. That and because Sierra Madre obviously does not want that area developed.

But whatever the reason, news has now reached The Sierra Madre Tattler that the developer has pulled out of this project and taken their "Montereys" and "Italian Villas" with them.

It has also been revealed to us that no other developer has signed on yet to take New Urban West's place. Something that now leaves the entire project in a state of limbo. Certainly this is not how the proponents for development on that property saw things turning out when they kicked this all off one short year ago.

Which brings us to the other big Mater Dolorosa development mystery du jour.

What is Jerry Pearson up to?

As we reported yesterday, Arcadia's own Jerry Pearson, who, along with Burbank boomer investment guru Cameron Thornton serves as a mouthpiece for development at Mater Dolorosa, has been making the rounds at Sierra Madre's "community outreach" meetings on our current budgetary challenges. Who invited him, or why he would be showing up at events that have nothing to do with a housing development project such as the one he has been advocating for, is a topic now available for our speculation.

Here is how we reported this yesterday.


The notion that 50 new homes packed onto the monastery property would be "water net neutral" was vigorously tossed and gored here yesterday in the comments. So today I thought we should take a look instead at the claims Jerry is making to anyone who will listen about all of that cash Sierra Madre would get if only we would just step out of his way and let the project go forward.

In order to attract another developer to take the place of the now departed New Urban West, the pro-monastery development faction headed by these two talkative out-of-towners (both of whom have yet to reveal any personal financial stake in this project), some support in this community is going to need to be manufactured.

That cash message, which apparently is being delivered at these meetings by Jerry Pearson from a carefully prepared script, is being presented to the people of Sierra Madre as a kind of solution to our budgetary woes. Jerry is apparently planning on attending a majority of the other community outreach gatherings as well, so you can see how he might be committed to this approach.

So where would this windfall cash actually come from? Development Impact Fees. The money that supposedly alleviates the financial impact new development infrastructure expenses make upon communities such as ours. They would cover the costs of water hook-ups, sewer connections, roads and the many other things you'd hope to see attached to a house.

But do they really cover those kinds of costs? At least on a dollar to dollar basis?

According to the NATIONAL IMPACT FEE SURVEY: 2012 (link), put together by an outfit called Duncan Associates out of Austin, Texas, there is something rather interesting about how this is accomplished in California. Apparently here Development Impact Fees are near exponentially higher than they are everywhere else. Which either means we have the most expensive sewers on the planet, or something else is at work.

Here is a chart contained in this report that shows this disparity quite clearly.


And here is another one with some actual numbers attached. Please note that we are talking three years ago, and the house prices assumed in this survey were based on a national average of $200,000. Which is just about the price of a stand alone garage here in Sierra Madre.


Next is a sampling of Development Impact Fees charged in select California cities. Here you can see DIF costs that are literally through the roof. Even a second story one. Click on the chart below to enlarge for easier viewing.


Trust me on this, Sierra Madre's Development Impact Fees are far closer to Napa than they are Placer or Redlands.

So why are California's development fees so much higher than they are everywhere else in this country? Especially in the kinds of communities developers so desperately covet, places like Sierra Madre?

Simply put, this is a mechanism that allows developers to funnel a lot of money to city governments. Especially in those cities where development such as the kind being pushed at Mater Dolorosa is so incredibly unpopular with the residents. Especially those residents who, because of proximity issues, would have to endure years of loud construction noise, dust, and truck diesel smoke.

Which is a high price to pay for somebody else's retirement. You would have hoped they'd have planned a little better for their old age.

At approximately $60,000 per each of the 50 proposed biggish bungalows at Mater Dolorosa, the Development Impact Fees the City of Sierra Madre could realize pencil out at right around $3 million dollars. Which is a vibrant number that just might turn any platinum pension-driven City Hall employee head.

In other words, in California these sky high Development Impact Fee rates give developers the opportunity to put some mad stacks into the institutional pockets of the local governmental agencies making the calls on their developments.

Kind of cozy, right? Not that we would ever stoop so low as to suggest that this DIF arrangement is a form of corruption unique to California, a state that leads the nation when it comes to development related shenanigans.

Nor would we use the word "bribery" either, a term that, if presented in this context, would suggest that there are decorum issues on this site.

But there are those who do think that about these fees.

If you see Jerry Pearson at any of the community outreach meetings you're planning to attend, maybe you should ask him about the role Development Impact Fees play here in California. Then let me know what he says.

I'd be interested to hear his take.

sierramadretattler.blogspot.com

105 comments:

  1. Great post Tattler for uncovering what really is a form of bribery. As southern California and other areas become increasingy built out, the only open space remaining are areas that are very environmentally sensitive and difficult to build on for a variety of reasons. This is why developers are forced into trying to develop areas that really shouldn't be developed in the first place and weren't developed in the first place because of those reasons. That is why we are going to see more and more battles with developers and people literally lying in front of the bulldozers to stop it. One of the ways, they are able to succeed however, is because they can bribe the city with their development impact fees which often puts Staff Staff on their side because more money in the city's coffers means more money for salaries, benefits, and pensions. They also will put alot of money into the political campaigns of prospective City Council members in the hope that once elected the developer will get a return on their investment i.e. a favorable vote on their development plans. Any developer for the Mater Dolorosa project is going to find they will run into a buzz-saw here in Sierra Madre.

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    1. I think Mater Dolorosa will find that the City Council of Sierra Madre can't be bribed into shooting themselves in the foot.

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    2. New Urban West or any developer for that matter is going to find it difficult to spend their time and money on due diligence and "small group meetings" or whatever they call their community outreach only to find that the project will be denied down the road. Jerry Pearson's Arcadia would be a better place for New Urban West. There you can bribe the Council Members with trips to China and where the City Staff completely embraces unrestrained development to get more money in the General Fund. That's not Sierra Madre however.

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    3. I bet the folks at Mater Dolorosa wish they had taken that, what $10,000,000 proposal from Preserve Sierra Madre to buy the land and preserve it as open space.

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    4. Let's not lose sight of the multi billion dollar projects being built downtown with Chinese money. We really need more large hotels and condos anywhere in the state! Money drives the cities which are driven by high salaries of city employees. Can't get a pothole fixed in L.A. but you can get a raise.

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    5. Keep your eyes open for bottom feeders like CETT Investments. Developers who specialize in "distressed" real estate. In fact, I'll bet that the monastery folks have already reached out to them.

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    6. Is it "distressed" before or after CETT shows up? I'm so confused.

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    7. I think you need to look at it as pre and post-stink eye.

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    8. Mod- excellent analysis .Exactly what we should be able to read in the L.A. Times .
      Sadly it seems the Tattler cynics were correct ,it is all about the money. Selling out our town to pad the Platinum Pensions of City employees. Legal bribery by Developers to enable them to destroy our town.And the City management is complicit .
      It is just the same corrupt compact that the Public Service Employee Unions have with politicians.

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    9. Too much development is going on when we have a water emergency. Sierra Madre doesn't have enough water to take on any additional consumers of water.

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    10. wait wait wait a second

      tell the out of town developers and other yahoos to stay the heck out of our "community" meetings - they aren't part of our "community"

      why isn't our City Manager doing something about this?

      why are our "community" meetings and groups being hijacked by out of town developers, realtors, utility company lawyers and garbage company reps

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  2. We are losing open space everywhere we look. Just yesterday, the Pasadena Star News had an article titled "Industry's Cattle Ranch Sale Irks Residents". The City of Industry is going to be selling off the 2,500 acre Tres Hermanos Ranch in the Chino Hills near Diamond Bar. All that open space gone so that in place of a cattle ranch and rolling hills we have another enormous housing project - at a time when existing residents in California are supposed to make draconian cuts in their water use because of the worst drought in the history of California. The Tejon Ranch near Bakersfield will be the site of a new 12,000 unit housing project again replacing open space. And now here in Sierra Madre, Mater Dolorosa and Jerry Pearson want to replace the sacred land at the Monastery, displace the wildlife, turn Sunnyside into a highway, hurt the neighbors add traffic and pollution so that they can build one of the largest housing projects in Sierra Madre's history all at a time when Sierra Madre is running out of water. Someone, please tell me how this makes any sense?

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    1. It doesn't make any sense, that's why they are doing it.

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    2. Southern Calfornia doesn't have enough water any more for new housing projects. Yet we keep building and building. If you built it, they will come. We will run out of water and then we're all in trouble.

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    3. Don't forget about the 1,200 unit housing project going up in the Montebello Hills. Planning Commission there just approved it. Last remaining open space in that area too. So all these new water users there, at Tejon Ranch and in the Chino Hills despite the drought and the draconian water restructions. Why are we still building home housing units as we are running out of water?

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    4. Also, don't forget something closer to home. How are the Stonehouse and Stonegate projects going?

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    5. It's just crazy, crazy crazy.....
      What to do if resources are running out? Build.
      Crazy.

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    6. 8:24, last I heard there are 20+ projects being worked on in the Development department.

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    7. That is why staff is too busy to do things like look for water scofflaws. There's no money in it for them. They're too busy earning development impact fees. They get to feather their own nests.

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    8. 6:36, it makes a lot of CENTS, actually. Ha ha.

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    9. Stop the madness!

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    10. We are going to keep building until we run out of water completely. And that's besides all the traffic we see now. Try driving across Huntington Drive or try to cut through Pasadena or the 210 freeway. Its horrible. People are moving away because our quality of life is going down the tubes.

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  3. So Jerry Pearson who lives in Arcadia is now making the rounds of the community outreach meetings regarding the budget in Sierra Madre. The same Jerry Pearson who has attended so many Planning Commission and City Council Meetings over the years regarding their proposed housing project up at the Monastery. I think the first thing he needs to say to the residents of Sierra Madre before he speaks is "Hi I'm Jerry Pearson. I live in Arcadia and even though I have a financial interest in seeing that land up at the Monastery turned into a housing project, here's why its good for all of you......" As long as people know where he's coming from, they can then decide if anything he says is going to be in the best interests of Sierra Madre or the best interests of Jerry Pearson and the Passionists in Chicago who actually own the land. I, for one, am very sceptical when people from Arcadia and Chicago try to tell Sierra Madre residents what's best for us.

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    1. Is there any proven link between Pearson and the sale? I get the suspicion, just wonder if there's a cold hard fact.

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    2. Pearson claims he is doing it for the love of the Church. So yeah, I'd say there is a good chance he is getting a cut.

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    3. Jerry Pearson has been at the forefront of all efforts to push the Monastery project. That's why he goes to every meeting. Unfortunately, what happened at Mater Dolorosa is that a pro-development Board of Directors came into power over there and is now pushing this project on behalf of the owners in Chicago. They are all seeing dollar signs. Evidently, they see the 30 pieces of silver as being more important than their mission.

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    4. As wtih everything, you just follow the money and whose going to get it if a housing project ever gets built up there. No body cares about that land, they just want to line their pockets. And I'm talking about the Priests!

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    5. more blah blah blah blah blah blah developers - why do we attract such low talent with overblown egos who know what is best for our town because they want to make a million bucks and hit the road

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  4. Buh bye New Urban West!

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  5. Chicago and Arcadia - there's two cities Sierra Madre should emulate for good governance and ethical standards.

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  6. Congratulations to the folks at Preserve Sierra Madre. Quite a victory.

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  7. This is the most unethical project in Southern California and without irony it is once again the men in the Catholic Church trying to do their best to do whatever they want.

    There is no shame for any of the Priests/Brothers at the Monastary because retirement has become primary to serving the needs of the works of the Beatitudes.

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    1. Why do they want to sell off that land to fund their own retirements? Don't they understand what that property means to their mission or have they lost sight of all that. Bring back Father Pat. He understood what that place means to not only the faith community, but the people who would take walks and the animals. Is it any wonder why the Catholic Church is having so many problems right now and losing followers right and left. Its very sad. Its not the message, its the people and the people running things now are flawed.

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    2. Tremendous victory for preservation in Sierra Madre.

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    3. Just one battle in the war. It's ain't over.

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    4. It will never be over.

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    5. Good riddence to New Urban West and any other predatory developer who comes along. The lesson is "Don't mess with Sierra Madre"

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    6. 7:08- Reality check. This land development deal had been brewing for a very long time and the transfer of Fr. Pat to Detroit was really a reward to him for his stellar ministry work for the previous 20 years. The Passionists knew this would be a contentious project and I believe they moved Fr. Pat to protect him from all the slings and arrows. it was an act of kindness on the part of the Passionists toward Fr. Pat.

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    7. 10:40, I think you're right about the timing. The Passionists were very closely following the high school development proposed for One Carter, and were supportive of the development of that area of the hillsides, one way or another. They were worried about precedences being set back then - 1999, 2000. Had their eyes on the ball at least 15 years ago.

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    8. Once you sell off that land you never get it back. The retreat center will start to go downhill too after that. They should just give up their mission (if they still have one) and sell off the entire property to keep it intact. The Huntington Library in San Marino had some problems awhile back and they could have sold off some of their "excess" land for millions of dollars. Because they realized they have something special there and land is scarce, they didn't sell it and now you have the beautiful Chinese garden. Mater Dolorosa needs to think outside the box and come up with a better idea than another unwanted housing project. They should step back, take a deep breath and explore other alternatives.

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    9. Maybe God is telling Mater Dolorosa something. The question is are they so far removed from their spiritual calling that they cannot hear?

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    10. How sad for you, 12:58. You have obviously never been on retreat at Mater Dolorosa. They do, indeed, have a vibrant ministry. Oh, and have you ever seen the grounds on Good Friday?

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    11. If they have such a vibrant ministry, why do they want to sell off the land they have managed to keep intact since 1924. Why now? What you are saying 1:24 is why they are being short-sighted and foolish to sell off the land. Where will all the people park on Good Friday by the way. They don't care about their ministry. All they care about is funding their own retirements - if that's the real reason they need the money. Some have said they need the money to pay the massive legal judgements as a result of you know what.

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  8. I believe there is a cold place in hell for those who lie in silence and live in gold when they have taken an oath of poverty and not feed the poor, care for the sick and live among those who needs are greater than theres.

    Amazing that nuns live in small communities taking care of each other, and still work for all the people around them. Still, the men believe they are entitled. Galling.

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    1. 6:59, are you a member of the No-Nothing Party? You can Google it up.

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    2. I think it is safe to say that in this case God has favored the residents.

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    3. 7:59, that's an iffy claim. Have to see what happens next.

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    4. Might have been a mood swing.

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    5. As Abraham Lincoln said: "Right makes might". Mater Dolorosa should not sell off their property for the 30 pieces of silver. Its not good for the community, the neighbors, the retreatants or Mater Dolorosa itself. Someone up there should say no to the development interests that now control the Board of Directors up there and stop what would be a very divisive project. Aren't Priests supposed to care about that kind of thing?

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  9. Speaking of religion and religious beliefs, here's a cliche - when God shuts one door he (she?) opens another. Here's the silver lining - Preserve Sierra Madre never would have happened without the Mater Dolorosa sell off, not the least of which was helping to elect a Council member who really is on the side of preservation - Denise Delmar. Thank you Matt Bryant, Barry Gold and the PSM group! As with all our victories, we've got to remain vigilant. Don't forget Tuesday's City Council meeting where Council will once again discuss changing the requirements for a Conditional Use Permit for a tear down, even more important now that this project has been denied. Please put it on your calendar and plan to attend at 6:30 so that you will be there when Gene Goss comes up with more phantom people who have called him to tell him they cannot afford $2900 for the permit when they want to put up a second story...which will cost how much?!

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  10. There's gonna be another developer coming along, that's for sure.

    I'm concerned that The Passionists sell off a big chunk of raw land to raise money. Then it'll be Katie bar the door when we have to deal with whatever that developer comes up with. Higher density? More homes? Bleh.

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    1. Just what happened with Carter. First developer comes in, ruins the land, goes bankrupt, bank takes over, next developer comes in, sues the city.

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    2. Preserve Sierra Madre mulches another one. Awesome!

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    3. I'm thinking the land will be sold, either now or not too much later. Be on alert.

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    4. It would make a great goat farm. Is it zoned G1?

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  11. Too good to be true? Is New Urban West really gone, really?

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    1. They are a big and highly successful company that can recognize a loser project when they see one.

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    2. As far as New West is concerned, time is money and it's time for: Next!

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    3. New Urban West does nto want to spend time and money on their due diligence only to be denied down the road. They are pros. They saw the writing on the wall.

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  12. Interesting that the Arcadia guy can speak at the outreach meetings. If he was at Stockley's meeting on Saturday it is even more interesting. We had a schedule conflict for the open forum and we asked Stockley if we could attend his meeting. He said no! I guess we aren't developer oriented enough!!

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    1. Stockley's meeting? Stockley had his own meeting? Where was it held - Carter One, Stockley's legacy to Sierra Madre.

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    2. Where was Stocklys meeting? Was it a private gathering, or one of the public outreach meetings?

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    3. The whining must have been intense.

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    4. Stockley's meeting was the very first outreach affair. May 2nd, I believe. At his estate.

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    5. Stockly's meeting was for the Sierra Madre Foundation and they are not open meetings.. There are plenty of other meetings you can attend if you want to. Of course, if you have ever been to the Stockly Estate you would see it is a typical California bungalow like the one you are probably living in.

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    6. I hear he has lots of overdue library books at his house.

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    7. This was supposed to be a community outreach meeting. I live in Sierra Madre and was told I could not come by Mr. Stockley. It is his house. He was the host, so I respected his right to decide who can come. But why does Pearson, who is not a member of our community, get to come and plant the notion that if we allow 50 homes to be built at the monastery all our budget problems will be solved?

      Is this part of the city’s plan to be able to say that the feedback from the community outreach meetings was to allow the 50 monetary houses to be built?

      This is really devious tactics by our elected representatives. We need to keep a very close eye on this one.

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  13. Monterey style? Adele Chang Monterey?

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    1. Yes, 8:38, the de rigueur Monterey. Faux California, faux Spanish, with a bit of faux craftsman thrown in. Uninspired template architecture available in all new development in Southern California.

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    2. As authentic as a developer's promise.

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    3. How cool! We can all look like South Orange County.

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    4. Cookie Cutter California. Heck, everyone votes for the same party, they might as well live in houses that all look the same.

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    5. 8:32AM here. This was a city sponsored meeting regarding financial matters. It was held on behalf of the foundation that Stockley runs. He said he decided to hold it in his home. Both Capoccia and Delmar were prestn as scheduled. I have no idea if staff was there, who attended, or how many. I would think an outreach in a community would have at lease 50 people. But I can't say.

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    6. Thanks. Out of curiosity, do you know the name of the foundation?

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    7. Sierra Madre Community Foundation.

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    8. 1:18PM If we could go to other meetings than why couldn't we go to Stockley's? Community means just that. You must be a library/Stockley groupie! At which of the many community meetings that have been held did Pearson give the information he was pulling out and why? Shouldn't that have been made public? Oh thank you Mr. Tattler for making things transparent!

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    9. Sierra Madre Community Foundation hasn't made any grants for the last 3 years, so Stockley runs it?

      http://www.sierramadrefoundation.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=48&Itemid=2

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    10. So community outreach meetings are to give info about how to balance the budget. And who do we hear from? A developer and someone who doesn't even live in the city. Some community! Then we have Pearson who tells about all the money that we could have in property fees and property taxes. He doesn't live here either.

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    11. Jerry Pearson is from Arcadia and the owners of the Monastery land are from Chicago. They have the nerve to tell us what's best for Sierra Madre. They don't care about how it impact on Sierra Madre - the traffic, congestions, displacement of wildlife, traffic on Sunnyside, the drought, none of that matter to them.

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  14. Wait a minute! 8:32: These are city scheduled meetings on financial matters that affect all the citizens of Sierra Madre, some held in private homes, and yet the homeowner can say who can and cannot come to the meeting? Was there a member of the city coucil there, was there a member of the staff there? I say this is highly irregular and should be investigated.

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    1. I don't think anyone has been checking IDs at the door, 8:45. But go ask Stockley.

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    2. You needed to show a library card.

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    3. Why would anyone trust Stockly?
      He never recused himself from making development decisions when the bank he worked for had a financial relationship with the developer involved. And he spoke stridently about the need for Sierra Madre to capitulate to developers or be sued. So we capitulated and were sued.

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    4. As I said above, there are plenty of meetings that have the same information at each meeting. Basically there is a presentation of the material that Crawford posted a few days ago, then they ask if anyone has any ideas. No pitch (I assume that will come later). If you want to get a group together for a presentation, I'm sure they would be glad to schedule one.

      At the Library Trustee's meeting following the presentation, Jerry Pearson came up and said that the developer had pulled out of the contract because of lack of cooperation by the city. (Yea Save Sierra Madre) He also reminded us that the Monastery property is not taxed and with a development the city would get the property tax. He talked about being water neutral and one of the examples he gave was to have the developer replace the youth baseball fields with artificial turf. Outside of being horrible to play on and dangerous to our kids, it is not a permeable surface, so we would lose most of the rain water when we do get rain.

      At one of the community outreach meetings when presented with the math, Pearson was forced to admit that not all of the monies were going for retirement funds. Some of the monies would fund their missionary work in India.

      Keep up the pressure on the City Council to get the new ordinance passed asap so if (when) they do get a new developer, these laws will be in place.

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    5. Happened to be at city hall today where Pearson was speaking to the Senior Commission. Woe is me if he gets them on his side!!!

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    6. Was Nancy Pants there?

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    7. He and those who are in cahoots with him will be working it.

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    8. Jerry Pearson is pushing more snake oil than any traveling salesman ever did. The idea that they are going to fund water conservation measures so that we allow all these new water consumers from their housing project is the most bogus idea any one has come up with. Granted, we need water conservation measures but they are supposed to save us water and not just break even and be offset by all those new McMansions. If the water crisis gets worse, we won't have any further room to tighten our belts because the water conservation measures have already been used up by what they are offering.

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  15. It looks ike the wildlife will be able to live a little longer.

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    1. Watch out for bow hunters.

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    2. My wife saw eight deer over at Mater Dolorosa running and playing on the grounds. I bet St. Francis is happy they have been granted a stay of execution and hopefully will be granted a complete pardon so that they can enjoy those beautiful grounds as much as we have all these years. Its too bad that certain people up there just want to monetize the land for to feather their own nest.

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    3. I believe the term "sacred trust" applies here.

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  16. Sierra Madre Foundation, aka Stockley's repentance.

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  17. Turn in Poachers and Polluters

    Bow hunting or hunting of any kind is prohibited by Sierra Madre Code. If you see anyone heading into the foothills up Bailey Canyon or Mt Wilson Trail with any hunting equipment call 355-1414 (Sierra Madre PD0 and CalTIP 1-888-334-2258 (24/7: California Department of Fish and Wildlife). The hunting season, where permitted, is heavily regulated and there are prohibitions against hunting within certain distances of Forest recreation areas (that would include the trails into the National Forest after people leave the city limits of Sierra Madre--but most cannot read a map that would show them when they are outside the city limits and where the national forest starts). Not only do you need a hunting licsense, you need a tag for the animal you are hunting, depending on the season.

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  18. Poaching
    Poaching is the illlegal take of fish and wildlife. It can involved hunting or fishing out of season, the taking of more fish or game animals than the law allows, or illegal commercialization of our wildlife. It can also include trespassing, hunting or fishing in closed aras such as Marine Life Protection Areas or Game Reserves. All species of wildlife in California are affected; some most commonly poached include deer, bear, antelope, elk, abalone, sturgeon, salmon, crab and lobster. Poachers devastate the state's natural resources by breaking laws designed to assure proper wildlife management and species survival, its full impact on California's ecology is impossible to gauge.

    Call 1-888-334-2258

    Be prepared to give the following information: Location of the Violation; Speces; Date/Time fo Violation; Description of Suspect(s); Description of Vehicle(s); Liscense Plate Number; Drection of Travel

    You do not have to give your name or other personal information.

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  19. We need an audit. Too many shenanigans, by too many....
    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-controller-industry-investigation-20150507-story.html#navtype=outfit

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  20. The Civility Party are reorganizing themselves.

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  21. May I suggest your readers review this link:

    http://www.biabayarea.org/governmental-affairs/weekly-governmental-affairs-update/2014-weekly-reports/national-impact-fee-survey-released-california-highest-by-far/

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  22. these people don't owe you a goddamn thing

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    1. Stay off my cactus patch.

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    2. 8:36, who are "these people" and who is "you"?

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    3. Grouchy people make me laugh.

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