Wednesday, June 3, 2015

El Nino In The Nick Of Time?

Click here for video.
Mod: Does anyone know what a "nick of time" might be? Why is it a nick? I know you can nick your self shaving, plus there is also the jolly Saint Nick. 

Anyway, there apparently is cause for hope. This from the Los Angeles Times (link):

Hopes rise for a strong El Niño to ease California drought - In Texas, Oklahoma and Mexico, destructive storms flooded communities and unleashed a tornado, leaving more than two dozen dead.

Across Southern California, this month has been decidedly cooler and wetter. San Diego had its wettest May in 94 years, and Los Angeles saw nearly four times its average rainfall. This month, the San Diego Padres were forced to call a rain delay — only the fifth time that has happened in Petco Park's 11-year history. Even the Mojave Desert is running as much as 5 degrees cooler than normal.

To some scientists, these are signs that the elusive, unpredictable El Niño weather phenomenon is gaining strength — and offering a glimmer of hope after more than three years of extreme drought.

El Niños have been responsible for two of California's wettest and most destructive rainy seasons: the winters of 1982-83 and 1997-98.

Now, experts say, a potentially powerful El Niño this winter could be the beginning of the end of the drought.

This month's weather suggests how El Niño's building strength is already affecting the United States. It's giving weather scientists reason to be cautiously optimistic that it has the stamina to see it through California's rainy season, which typically begins in October and ends in April.

"Can one big year ease the drought conditions? Yes, it can," said Michael Anderson, state climatologist with the California Department of Water Resources. "It can definitely replenish the surface storage and can have some benefit to starting to replenish some of the groundwater."

Mod: Wouldn't that be nice?

Bonus Coverage

Water use reduction figures by supplier (not city) for April are now out. You can link to them here. Statewide the reduction was 13.5%, though not everyone got on board (link).

sierramadretattler.blogspot.com

46 comments:

  1. So do ya think the government of California will be smart enough to build water reservoirs to capture this rain so that the next dry spell won't be as awful to get through?

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    Replies
    1. I think all the money is going for the fast choo choo.

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    2. The train to nowhere fast.

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    3. They're too busy spending money on ObamaCare for illegal immigrants. CA is the only state to do that.

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    4. I think you need a drivers license to do that. Oh, wait ...

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  2. "...just before it is too late..." But it is too late already, 51 dead oak trees in the Hahamonga park below JPL, many more scattered all over the hillsides and canyons.

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  3. Could El Nino Help Bust the California Drought?
    With El Niño being a major player in the demise of the Texas drought, the question is will the same phenomenon help funnel heavy rain into drought-stricken California.
    El Niño occurs when ocean water temperatures climb above average across the central and eastern Pacific, centered around the equator.
    According to AccuWeather Meteorologist Ben Noll, "The warmer sea surface water strengthens the storm track over the Pacific Ocean and across the southern United States, especially during the winter, spring and autumn months of the year."
    The storm track during the summer is generally weak and disrupted by high pressure off the Pacific coast of North America. http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/could-el-nino-help-bust-califo/47878546

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    Replies
    1. It is old news that EL Nino is back:
      http://www.weatherwest.com/

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    2. The floods in Texas is what put it back in the headlines. That and these things are very hard to predict accurately. Like all weather.

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  4. Californians conserve water by 13.5 percent in April, most so far this year … Many foothill communities in Los Angeles County with homeowners living on large lots fared better in April. Glendora cut use by 26 percent; Arcadia, 15 percent; Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, 10 percent; Inglewood, 15 percent; Whittier, 22 percent; and Thousand Oaks, 14 percent. http://www.pasadenastarnews.com/environment-and-nature/20150602/californians-conserve-water-by-135-percent-in-april-most-so-far-this-year

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    Replies
    1. Anybody know where Sierra Madre is at?

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    2. Sierra Madre is a quaint village 13 miles N.E. of Los Angeles

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    3. That is not a lucky number.

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    4. Numerology has it that 13 is read as life number 4:
      4 Positive Traits
      Strong sense of order and values, struggle against limits, steady growth, highly practical, scientific mind, attention to detail, foundation for achievement, a genius for organization, fine management skills.
      4 Negative Traits
      Lack of imagination, caught up in detail, stubborn fixed opinions, argumentative, slow to act, too serious, confused.

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    5. 4 + 4 could leave you behind the 8 ball.

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    6. 8 is great:
      8 Positive Traits
      Executive character and abilities, political skills, expert handling of power and authority, working for a cause, achieving recognition, exercising sound judgment, decisive and commanding.
      8. Negative Traits
      Workaholic, overly ambitious, lacking humanitarian instincts, mismanaging money, repressing subordinates, impatient with people, stressed, materialistic.

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    7. Surely you don't mean that.

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    8. I'm not feeling the love, here!

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  5. We have really changed how we do things in our household. I wonder how many of these frugal habits will make it through better times!

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    Replies
    1. A 32% reduction by next spring is going to be tough. I wonder how much the Kensington has added to Sierra Madre's water use numbers.

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    2. Remember, 8:20, Billy Shields explained that old people don't use water.

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    3. It's true. The inmates are dry cleaned.

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    4. Anyone know what their allotment is?

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    5. Don't count your chickens before they hatch. We still have 0% snowpack and no relief in sight and once water rates go up they never go down,my primary incentive for saving water is monetary.

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    6. Gotta keep water rates up, they make for a UUT goldmine.

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    7. You are so right 10:44. Just like the damn UUT. Originally it was a short term source of revenue, never intended to last. Hah!

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    8. Old taxes never die, they just go up.

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    9. yeah but the difference is that our neighbors did this to us with the UUT

      Whenever I see John Buchanan in town I always get a taste of bile in my mouth

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    10. I'm pretty sure that Buchanan likes that. I think he enjoys other peoples' discomfort.

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    11. He is an HR attorney for Edison. You know, the place where employees shoot each other. Not lovely.

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  6. It's raining! Well, just a drizzle, better than nothing.

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    Replies
    1. Very refreshing, and life sustaining for the hillsides...

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  7. Come meet Bill Patzert, who is an oceanographer and climatologist at Jet Propulsion Laboratories and famously our climate reporter and guru. He's speaking tonight at a special program in Pasadena.
    Pasadena Group of Sierra Club program, Wednesday June 3, 2015: "California's Extended Drought: Climate Change or Part of a Long-Term Natural Cycle?"

    At 7 pm at Eaton Canyon Nature Center, 1750 N Altadena Dr in NE Pasadena. For more information contact Group Membership Chair, Elizabeth Pomeroy, 626-791-7660.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks. I'd be curious to get his take on the El Nino question. After 3 years of this awful drought it almost sounds too good to be true.

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    2. Last time I heard old Bill speak he was blaming climate change on former President Bush and urged everyone to vote for the Democrats. So, how did that work out Bill?

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    3. I don't know why anyone would want to talk about those people. There are so many far more interesting things to discuss.

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    4. Patzert's presentation, minus the charts and graphs, basically covered the material in this article

      http://www.lamag.com/citythinkblog/the-prophet-of-california-climate-a-dialogue-with-bill-patzert/

      The Pacific Decadal Oscillation is the long cycle that influences the dry and wet cycles. The warming temperatures are influencing the intensity of the cycles. The reason we have a serious drought now is because of the higher temperatures + lower precipitation = no snowpack. Plus a far bigger population than before, which creates a greater demand for water than is actually now available.

      http://www.sgvtribune.com/environment-and-nature/20150207/global-warming-wasnt-the-only-reason-2014-was-californias-hottest-year

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  8. What's the video Mod? I can't get it to play, and would like to see it!

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  9. Something totally irrelevant

    YOU’RE WELCOME. WE DID IT. WE TOOK DOWN BLATTER. AMERICA, OF ALL PLACES, SAVED SOCCER. AMERICA IS BACK. LET’S GET WILD. COCA COLA. MOTORCYCLES. EAGLES. FREEDOM. LIBERTY. HAPPINESS. ALL THE OTHER THINGS WE INVENTED AND/OR TOOK CREDIT FOR. TELL THE WORLD, TWITTER. TELL THE WORLD.

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    Replies
    1. From what I have been reading soccer fans all over the world feel a lot of gratitude to America for taking these bums down.

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    2. 11:57, may I suggest decaf?

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    3. ALL CAPS has the power of 60 camels.

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  10. 6:34 CA. been doing that for ever, where you been living?

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  11. Bonus Coverage,,,,,,,,,, I did not see Sierra Madre on that list

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    Replies
    1. It is a list of water producers. Sierra Madre no longer qualifies.

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