Saturday, February 13, 2016

Ed Ring: California Initiative Would Require Legislators to Wear Logos of Donors

Mod: This could very well be on the ballot in California for us to vote on soon. It is beyond brilliant and I hope it happens. The idea being that, should the voters approve, our state legislators would be required to wear the logos of the special interests that contribute to their campaigns. Link here to see this in its original setting.


If you are bemused by the success of populist candidates for President, if you think national politics in America is at risk of becoming a circus spectacle, get ready. Because that circus is coming to California. Southern California businessman John Cox is collecting signatures for a ballot initiative that will require state politicians to wear the logos of their top ten campaign contributors.

If voters approve this measure, every time a state senator or member of the assembly votes on the floor or in a committee, they will have to wear these logos on their jackets. As the text of the initiative puts it, “the disclosure shall be printed clearly and legibly, be conspicuous and in a type size sufficient that it can be read by a member of the public observing any public session of the Legislature or a Committee thereof.”

Truth is indeed stranger than fiction. But then again, isn’t Cox’s initiative just making explicit what everybody’s known for a very long time?

As Cox puts it, “unions and corporations have too much power and it’s time we stand up and fight. The ‘California is Not For Sale Initiative’ will bring a level of transparency never before seen in politics.”

For those of us who’ve been trying to expose the inordinate influence government unions have on California’s state legislature, passage of Cox’s initiative will have tremendous educational value. Because the vast majority of politicians in the chambers would be sporting the logos of government unions, not private corporations, contrary to the popular wisdom these unions purchased through literally billions in taxpayer funded propaganda over the past 30 years. The most likely top logo? CTA.

When asked if this initiative might be viewed as a political stunt rather than a serious attempt at reform, Cox didn’t hesitate. “This is part of a long-range plan,” he said, “sometimes you need ridicule and satire to get people to focus on the problem.”

It’s interesting to wonder how politicians will adapt to the "Name All Sponsors Candidate Accountability Reform Initiative,” because Cox is serious. He’s putting some of his own substantial fortune into paid signature gathering, and  will adapt to the “in addition to growing media coverage (US News, Salon, Washington Times, Al Jazeera), campaign reform advocates from outside California have expressed an interest in assisting his campaign.

If Cox’s measure qualifies for the November 2016 ballot, who would vote against it? And how would anyone oppose it? Who will oppose the “wealthy out-of-state special interests behind this sinister measure,” when those interests include campaign reform democrats like Lawrence Lessig and Ben Cohen? Will the unions be quiescent? Will the CTA concede, without a fight, that starting in January 2017, their logo will probably occupy top position on more legislator’s jackets than any other special interest?

The bipartisan support for Cox’s initiative is encouraging. Because the discussion it generates will help dispel the myth that there is opposition between crony corporate interests and public sector union interests. The truth is that these interests work together. The operative political philosophy in Sacramento is cronyism. Business interests avoid direct conflict with government unions because those unions decide what legislation gets advanced and what legislation is stopped. And if these unions increase taxes and regulations to further their agenda, and in the process they destroy small businesses, large corporations have less competitors. It’s a win-win for the cronies.

It will be fun, in less than one year, to go to the Capitol gallery and view the coats of the lawmakers. “CTA,” side by side with “AT&T.” “AFSCME,” right next to “PG&E.” The crony convention. The California circus. Cox’s initiative will make it plain to see.

Mod: As an example, here is a chart (link) that details all of the donors Chris Holden enjoyed taking money from during his most recent California Assembly race. Should this brilliant idea become law, Chris would be required to wear the logos of his 10 largest campaign donors. Including McDonalds and Genentech.



sierramadretattler.blogspot.com

31 comments:

  1. Well, it reminds me of going to Atlanta and the man approaches you with a trench coat, and asks, hey kid, wanta buy a watch. Then he opens his trench coat and shows you all of his watches for sale. One could see, The new hopefully elected politician carring his coat under his arm, failing to disclose his sponsors stickers. Might be a good idea, I can't not by into this approach

    ReplyDelete
  2. Would this include city council members?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm thinking the SMPD patch that Harabedian would wear might become a collectors' item.

      Delete
  3. This concept sounds good until you read the fine print, there is NO size of shape of these named logos and as it's been said before read the fine print at the bottom the print will be so small you will need a magnifying glass to read them all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Do you have a source for these misgivings? As far as I know the law does not allow for fine print on ballot initiatives. All one sized font.

      Delete
  4. Here are some of the logos John Harabedian would need to wear:
    01/06/12 Dustin Callas, Los Angeles: Chief Financial Officer CourtCall, LLC ($250)
    01/08/12 Patrick Collins, New York NY: Morgan Stanley ($200)
    01/10/12 Alexander Faherty, Manasquan NJ: Vice President Cerberus Capital Management ($200)
    01/11/12 Christopher Hagale, Houston TX: Bartlit, Beck, Herman, Palenchar & Scott ($100)
    02/19/12 Maggie J McKinley, Washington DC: Bredhoff & Kaiser ($100)
    01/20/12 Lauren Ontanon, Glendale CA: Paramount Pictures ($1,000)
    01/08/12 Brian Proctor, San Diego CA: Sempra Utilities Energy ($300)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Interesting article on Cerberus.
      http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/cerberus_collected_ex-government_opportunists_20121228

      Delete
    2. What doe these donors have to do with Sierra Madre?

      Delete
  5. Brilliant! This we love!
    Let's hold these politicians accountable. Let's know who benefits with them in office.

    ReplyDelete
  6. You people posting against this idea...are you elected officials or family members of elected officials?
    Just asking

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Sierra Madre Police Assoc kicked in big for Councilmember Harabedian. If I had to guess a source that would be it.

      Delete
    2. Excellent investment. If UUT passes it will pay off 10 fold. Good job by the union.

      Delete
  7. Something like this would be good as well.
    http://l.victorystore.com/signs/sandwich-board-signs.php

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anything and everything that will expose people in government for what they are. Almost always they doing the bidding of whoever gives them the biggest donations. Some even have big phony charities or Foundations in their name to collect money for themselves.
      WC Fields explained this.
      ANYTHING WORTH HAVING IS WORTH CHEATING FOR

      Delete
  8. The truth shall set you free.

    ReplyDelete
  9. This reminds me of the race cars. If you get in an accident, and hurt someone, and have decals on your car, everyone gets sued

    ReplyDelete
  10. Al Jazeera America to close down. Unsustainable business model cited in decision to close as global network announces a new digital drive in US market

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anybody have a hankie?

      Delete
  11. I do but it's pretty dirty.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I wouldn't get too excited--politicians are experts in finding loopholes and ways around such reforms. They'd probably figure out a way to funnel funding through PACS or some other kind of external entity.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, but state law does require them to declare where they get their happy campaign cash from. And wouldn't it be nice if a couple of them ended up in the pokey because they tried to evade wearing their patches?

      Delete
  13. Just like race car drivers. Great idea to show who they are looking out for. It's certainly not the little guy. Sad state of affairs but most politicians cater to their campaign donors to feed their own ambition to be a career politician.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Elaine might to start wearing the Jiffy Lube or Midas logos regardless. Heard the Benz needs an oil change.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Those red mercedes are expensive to maintain. I heard city hall wants to raise the UUT Taxes again and create a another property tax. I am not in favor of more taxation,

    ReplyDelete
  16. Please clarify...
    When the Clinton's left office, and took the millions of dollars of Presidential heirlooms, the white house furniture, did they return all of it and did they receive fines for theft?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Howz it going on your planet, 12:04?

      Delete
  17. Scalia is finally dead a great day for all Americans not so great if you're a bigot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dancing on another's grave is in poor taste, even if you're not a Christian.

      Rest In Peace, Antonin Scalia.

      Delete
    2. I feel sorry for the bucket.

      Delete
  18. They took $120,000.worth they returned about 1/2 of it.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I'm guessing Athens Services will be on a lot of candidate's paperwork then.

    ReplyDelete