Sunday, September 4, 2016

NPR: A Small Town Struggles With A Boom In Sober Living Homes

Mod: Good article on the sober home crisis from NPR


When Phillip decided to stop using heroin, he knew sticking around home was a recipe for failure.

"It's just, like, a heroin epidemic on Long Island where I'm from. So I had to get away from that and now I'm in Prescott, Ariz.," Phillip says. NPR agreed not to use his last name because he is struggling with addiction and fears it might hurt his chances of future employment.

Phillip and a handful of other young people are filtering through the line at a soup kitchen at the Prescott United Methodist Church just before noon. They are grabbing a bite to eat before their next meeting of recovering addicts nearby.

"Everybody here is basically, I feel like, in recovery and they're more serious about it," says Phillip.

Not like back home in New York, he says, where people shoot up in the parking lot before meetings.

You hear similar stories from others who come to this idyllic mountain community to shake their addiction. Outdoor recreation, a mild climate, scenic vistas and a welcoming attitude toward those in recovery is touted in a promotional video by a group called Drug Rehab Arizona.

And with its motto "Welcome to Everybody's Hometown," Prescott has become a hub for the multi-billion-dollar recovery industry. It's even listed by the recovery website TheFix as one of the top 10 destinations in the country to get sober.

This has caused a boom in sober living houses — homes where six to eight recovering addicts live under the supervision of a house manager, who is usually also a recovering addict. During the day, they typically go to outpatient treatment centers, attend meetings and once further into recovery, look for work. At last count, Prescott, population 40,000, had more than 150 of these sober living homes, with new ones opening up frequently. And some Prescott residents are upset.

Group homes have inundated the community, says Connie Cantelme, who lives in one of Prescott's historic neighborhoods where several sober houses have popped up.

"When you've got a hundred boys and men trying to kick a heroin problem, how do you feel safe living next door to them when they're falling off the wagon all the time?" she asks.

Once she remembers coming outside for her morning coffee to find that a man had overdosed under her deck.

Cantelme worries this influx of recovering addicts and the proliferation of group homes is tarnishing Prescott's image.

That's certainly a concern, says Allison Zelms, Prescott's deputy city manager, who says, "We are reaching a tipping point." But Zelms says an even greater concern is the quality of care in some of these programs.

"Are people really being sold a bill of goods, or are they going to come to Prescott to really have a good chance of success in their treatment?" Zelms asks.

That's a difficult question to answer. Group homes are generally easy to start, cheap to run and, in states like Arizona, largely unregulated, other than some city zoning and code enforcement.

You can read the rest here.

sierramadretatller.blogspot.com

27 comments:

  1. Political policy makers. Any change in the influx of Sober living homes being densly packed into neighborhoods, must be addressed on this level.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Right. That's why the city manager of Malibu has hooked up with a few others to get changes at the state level. Sierra Madre should join them.

      Delete
  2. If you don't care about state and local politics, you'll end up with state and local government officials that don't care about you.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Multi-billion dolllar industry.
    Is this why the State and Federal officials that have been voted into office over and over again won't address the issues of generational homelessness? "They" whine; show me the money.
    Much needed Drug/Sober housing is finally being addressed; but not regulated and shoe horned into neighborhoods.
    If these current Politicians remain in office; i question why the Homeless are not fully included back into Humanity?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The "treatment centers" work? You have any stats to back that up?

      Delete
    2. Nothing like bringing addicts together for a little empathy.

      Delete
    3. Addicts have empathy for their own needs.
      Anyone else's? Nah.

      Delete
  4. Prescott used to be a wonderful town to live in. Sierra Madre is next.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The greedy hustlers who set up these businesses, like the one on Carter in Sierra Madre, don't give a damn about the towns they use. They are just in it to make a good living.

      Delete
  5. Better a little empathy, than to live in a glass house.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Spoken like a true addict. I was at first really surprised at how often that comment was made, that the only reason people protest having these for-profit centers in their neighborhoods was because they themselves had substance abuse problems. Now I expect those kind of holier than thou statements.

      Delete
  6. And the greedy politicians you elect let them get away with it. Big government needs big revenue.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Bake them special brownies and welcome them to the neighborhood.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I'm a consultant in Orange County CA, who provides services to start-up rehabs and quality improvement assessment programs to existing substance abuse treatment centers. I have over 10 years in the business of administration, knowledgeable with State Licensing and CARF accreditation with residential treatment, partial hospitalization, and intensive outpatient treatment programs, including sober living settings. To give you an example of what the admission fees are in this part of town; $10,000 - $30,000 for a 28-day stay. Day treatment (partial hospitalization) typically costs about $500 per day. The business is profitable and very much needed. We're dealing with a demand that continues to rise and has a devastating affect our families, communities, and workplaces, just to name a few. Many residential treatment rehabs here in Southern California started as sober recovery homes that relied on community-based 12-Step Self-Help groups. On the other hand, treatment involves bringing together a small team of addiction/mental health professionals consisting of a physician familiar with addiction, maybe an RN, a MFT, and Licensed/Certified Substance Abuse Counselors. The latest addition to the treatment team are nutritionists, yoga and meditation instructors, physical fitness and wellness instructors. The more diversified your team, the more effective your program. Finally, a program addiction psychiatrist will make your program capable of treating dual diagnosis patients. These days we're seeing more depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorders in the diagnosis of our patients. Once your program has been established, then consider applying with major health insurance organizations for stable income. Cash-pay admissions tend to fluctuate with the economy. Lastly, location does tend to have an influence on getting the addict to agree to treatment. Going to the beach communities of Southern California for treatment may be the last bit of information needed in an intervention on a reluctant addict. - Garry L, RAS,CSC,CCDS

    ReplyDelete
  9. Prescott; still a nice town. So is Sierra Madre. Both tend to be more of a retirement setting.
    So; not sure by the text of next?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 12:52, google Dedicato Treatment Center.

      Delete
  10. There are a lot of people who make money off of these places. So the neighbors who lose value on their homes? That money in a way is being redirected to the drug kicking consortium.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Laughable,but if you say so.

      Delete
    2. Who, you? Most definitely. I have never heard of someone making a bigger offer on a house because of the junkies living next door.

      Delete
    3. The lawyers who specialize in setting these places up for one thing. The cons who run them for another.

      Delete
    4. Don't forget the marginally qualified staff members hired to keep watch.

      Delete
  11. 5:52. Holier than thou: Wisdom rests quietly in the heart of him who has understa ndin, But what us in the heart of fools is made known. Prov:14:33.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Who, in ypur opinion, is the fool here?

      Delete
    2. Add to 4:55's question, another one:
      who cites scripture for his own purposes?

      Delete
  12. Is this a website to solely talk crap and disrespect the men and women that run city hall! GEEZ! Give me a break! Someone has NO life. Really....! Can we ever support and help? Ever? Hatred and blogs such as these will never end unless YOU choose to make it happen. Until then....who ever this person is that created this blog, GET A LIFE!

    ReplyDelete
  13. My comment will be visible after approval...GO FIGURE.

    ReplyDelete