Saturday, March 25, 2017

Why Trump the deal-maker came off looking incompetent

Why Trump the deal-maker came off looking incompetent (CNN link): A President who admires strongmen tried to strong-arm the Republicans who control the United States House of Representatives. Pass the repeal of Obamacare and replace it with Trumpcare, Donald Trump told the 247 Republicans, or else you'll be ousted in a primary.

When that failed to move them sufficiently he added another threat: Vote with me or you'll never get another chance at health care reform. The Republicans gathered for an emotional pre-vote caucus in the basement of the Capitol. As they departed, many said it was one of the most impressive conferences they had ever attended. But when House Speaker Paul Ryan offered little more than a brief statement and dashed off without answering reporters' questions, the signs of defeat were apparent.

Having practiced his usual method of deal-making, Trump then walked away from the hard work of political negotiating. White House spokesman Sean Spicer, insisting there was no "plan B," predicted victory. While Ryan tried to get his House in order, the President climbed into a big-rig tractor parked outside the White House, sounded the horn like an excited boy and pretended he was driving. (He hadn't looked so happy in weeks.)

Despite all these expressions of confidence, the Republicans who run Washington never could come together behind Trumpcare. Hours before the vote, The Daily Beast reported that, according to officials in the administration who spoke on condition of anonymity, Trump's top adviser, Steve Bannon, wanted him to make a list of his House GOP enemies so they might be punished.

When this last tough-guy tactic failed, Trump and Ryan slammed on the brakes and canceled the showdown vote. CNN and other networks reported the debacle in real time and both men were left humiliated and diminished.

No one should be surprised that Trump's first big legislative initiative collapsed in a cloud of chaos. Aside from the development of his enormous ego, nothing in Donald Trump's life experience prepared him to actually function as president of the United States.

This became evident during the presidential transition, when he proved incapable of bringing the country together and then, upon his inauguration, when he immediately began offering lies and distortions about everything from the size of the crowd at the inauguration to the claim that the recent election was marred by massive voter fraud.

The most remarkable thing about the Trump presidency may be our expectation that he would be any different.

Republicans Land a Punch on Health Care, to Their Own Face (The New York Times link): At the end of the long day, the alliance of conservative ideologues who once shut down the government over President Barack Obama’s health care law could not find the will to repeal it.

Since the Tea Party wave of 2010 that swept House Republicans into power, a raucous, intransigent and loosely aligned group of lawmakers known as the Freedom Caucus — most from heavily Republican districts — has often landed a punch to its own party’s face.

Friday’s defeat of the Republican leadership’s bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act was a return to form, handing an immense defeat to President Trump and embarrassing Speaker Paul D. Ryan in his own House. It also challenged the veracity of their long-held claims that a Republican president was all they needed to get big things accomplished.

The most important question for Republicans now is whether the members of the Freedom Caucus will find themselves newly emboldened in ways that may bring the new president more defeats — or whether Mr. Ryan will do what former Speaker John A. Boehner could not, and find a way to shred their influence for good.

“If you are defined by your opposition to leadership, it’s hard to be part of a governing coalition,” said Alex Conant, a onetime aide to Senator Marco Rubio, the Florida Republican who was once a Tea Party star. “Their opposition to Trump’s health care bill should surprise nobody who’s paid attention for the last six years. Even the world’s best negotiator can’t make a deal with someone who never compromises.”

But the Freedom Caucus has never been about compromise. In 2011, it picked a huge, costly fight over Planned Parenthood. In 2013, it orchestrated a government shutdown over funding for the health care law. Then, in its most striking move, it deposed Mr. Boehner in 2015. The common thread: It has continuously been an adversary of legislation itself.

But after years of opposing power — both in the White House, which was occupied by a Democrat, and in the leadership of their own party — the conservatives were offered a chance to negotiate directly with the president and his budget director, a former Freedom Caucus member, over the bill to replace the Affordable Care Act. The members pushed and pushed Mr. Trump to the far right edges of policy, just as they have done for years on other bills. But they still could not get to “yes,” and therefore became part owners of the expansive health law they were trying to undo.

Health Care Defeat Is a Brutal Loss for Speaker Paul Ryan (The New York Times link): House Speaker Paul Ryan guaranteed a win on the Republican plan to dismantle Barack Obama's health care law. Instead, he suffered a brutal defeat, cancelling a vote and admitting "we're going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future."

Friday's painful rebuke is an ominous sign for President Donald Trump's agenda, from taxes to infrastructure to the budget. Looming in a few weeks is the need to agree on a bill to keep the government open. After the health care debacle, Trump told Republican leaders he's moving on.

The episode is a danger point for the relationship between Trump and Ryan, who had an awkward pairing during the campaign but worked in tandem on the GOP health measure.

"I like Speaker Ryan," Trump said. "I think Paul really worked hard."

Virtually every congressional Republican won election promising to repeal Obamacare. With a Republican in the White House, passage seemed almost guaranteed.

Ryan was steeped in the details, even at one point replicating for a nationwide cable news audience a detailed PowerPoint presentation he delivered to his members.

Earlier this month, he said flatly, "We'll have 218 (votes) when this thing comes to the floor, I can guarantee you that."

Ryan was thrust into the speaker's chair after the stunning 2015 resignation of John Boehner, R-Ohio, and a failed bid by Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. At the time, Ryan held his dream job — chairman of the powerful, tax-writing Ways and Means Committee — but took the job as the last viable option to lead a fractured House GOP.

While Ryan eased comfortably into the job, he's not the schmoozer Boehner was, a key skill in delivering like-minded but reluctant lawmakers. He lacked the steel and seasoning of Democratic rival Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., who delivered Obamacare in the first place — and that took months, not weeks.

Even before the bill went down, Pelosi was piling on, taunting Trump and, by implication, Ryan, for rushing the bill to the floor too early.

"You build your consensus in your caucus, and when you're ready, you set the date to bring it to the floor," Pelosi said. "Rookie's error, Donald Trump. You may be a great negotiator. Rookie's error for bringing this up on a day when clearly you're not ready."

Ryan entered the health care debate without the experience of having ever managed a situation of such magnitude.

"We were a 10-year opposition party where being against things was easy to do," a clearly disappointed Ryan said Friday. "And now, in three months' time, we've tried to go to a governing party, where we have to actually get ... people to agree with each other in how we do things."

sierramadretattler.blogspot.com

53 comments:

  1. Best part about today's graphics… The Hindenburg was even the cover photo of drudge yesterday. And drudge had been suppoting Trump so hard

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  2. Trolls get trumped again!

    Trump vowed to win a "better deal" for Americans before approving the Keystone XL and the Dakota Access oil pipelines, promising to extract concessions and force the builders to use U.S. steel.

    Now his administration has authorized both projects -- with those conditions mostly unmet. The outcomes illustrate the limits of the president’s power and poke holes in the carefully crafted image of Trump as a dealmaker so good at twisting arms that he wrote a book about his negotiating prowess.

    “Donald Trump’s promises on these pipelines are like the pipelines themselves: hollow," said Senator Ed Markey, a Democrat from Massachusetts. "The only promises being kept with approval of these pipelines will be the ones made to Big Oil who want to export this dirty oil to thirsty foreign markets at the expense of our environment and our economy."

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  3. Anyone who is in touch with their Inner Donald will readily recognize that Friday's colossal FAIL on Trumpcare was not fair to Republicans. No Russians were allowed to vote.

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  4. Ryan's on a roll
    Paul Ryan led each of these failures.
    2005: #SocialSecurity privatization.
    2011: #Medicare voucherization.
    2017: #ACA repeal.

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    1. Extremist ideologue out of touch with real working Americans

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    2. People saw through the lies.

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  5. Trump got in a truck, made some funny faces, and the internet reacted accordingly
    http://www.theverge.com/2017/3/23/15042320/trump-truck-tweets-jokes-bush-dukakis

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  6. Nixon and Romney came up with Heath Care.

    Obama made it happen across the aisle.
    Mc Connell made it clear "It will my job to make Obama a one term president."

    The black guy could not be allowed to take the credit.
    The tea party crazies had to lie and were believed.
    50 times the rethugs tried to take it down.

    Most americans did not know the ACA and Obamacare were the same.
    Again voting against their own health and other programs.

    Next?
    Oh yes. The comrades..

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  7. This was quite a failure and sets up the next stage of the Trump disaster nicely. The investigation into his criminal Russian ties.

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  8. Time to tackle taxes and infrastructure, if possible at the same time.
    The ACA/Obama Care should have been on the list of "things to do", and as it was pulled from vote; the realization of presenting too soon has been noted.
    Obama Care will still need repair and or replacement in the future, it does not work. That will be a Chuck and Nancy moment; since this bill was a Democrat design.

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    1. Obamacare is very popular as the support shown for it over the last few months shows. Improving it will take a bipartisan effort, something that Washington seems incapable of doing. The obstructionist party, the GOP, will continue to stand in the way, and will therefore take the blame for standing in the way of what the American people clearly want. The same kinds of health care every other modern industrialized democracies provide. Only the backwards and primitive Republican Party stands in the way of this.

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    2. 8:06 seems to believe that each time he posts that opinion it somehow becomes less untrue. Not the case.

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    3. Should o' could o' would o'. Your hindsight is impeccable, foresight not so much.

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    4. That's troll #1, spelling surprisingly well this mornings altright talking points

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    5. He's a chameleon.

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    6. The Obama care reform is coming folks. Don't forget that it failed the first few times thay tried to get it. Getting rid of it will be the same process.

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    7. "Somewhere over the rainbow..."

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  9. Presidents that have some things in common: Nixon and Obama.
    Not talking Health Care!

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    1. I think you meant to say Nixon and Trump. Obama was scandal free for 8 years. Trump didn't even make it through two months.

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    2. @ 9:13 you're giving Trump to much credit. He didn't even make it to inauguration day without scandal.

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    3. I miss Obama. So calm and clever no unnecessary drama. The only president with a degree in international diplomacy and who taught constitutional law

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  10. GOP Grand Obstructionist Party

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    1. Feel the bern sukkas!

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  11. "Why Trump the deal-maker came off looking incompetent" Because he is.

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  12. Thanks, but no. I ment to say 7:44am. Nixon and Obama; surveillance ...get it? Not Health Care.
    I believe that President Obama is taking ownership of ACA, I don't think he's given the credit to Nixon and Romney, or has he?

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    1. Looking at this comparison of the plans, Freed says, it’s easy to see that Nixon’s proposals were far more “liberal” than what passed under the Affordable Care Act during President Obama’s first term. Yet, he notes, the rhetoric directed against the ACA – as “a radical liberal plan,” “socialized medicine” and a “job killer” – seeks to paint the law in extremely inflammatory tones.

      At the time of Nixon’s proposals, those seeking a single-payer plan, led by Senator Ted Kennedy, scoffed and said that his plans did not go far enough. The Democrats’ early-70s health proposal was far more liberal than anything the party has proposed in recent times, and they heaped scorn on the Republican plan.

      Freed notes that the approach Nixon took, which preserved the insurance industry’s role in health care, would have covered more people than the ACA does.

      At the time, Nixon put forth this rationale for his plan: “Those who need care most often get care least. And even when the poor do get service, it is often second rate…This situation will be corrected only when the poor have sufficient purchasing power to enter the medical marketplace on equal terms with those who are more affluent.” Employees around the nation supported Nixon’s plan as a welcome alternative to the single-payer proposals.

      Both the Nixon plans and the ACA were driven by a desire to provide health coverage for the uninsured segment of the American people, says Freed, and to keep health care costs from continuing to rise out of control.

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  13. Part of the reason the repeal vote was pushed through too soon is because the GOP wanted to take advantage of the residual racism a great number of them still feel toward Obama. The sting of his presidency is still fresh in their vengeful, troglodytic minds.

    Imagine being the chosen rednecks of redneck districts, who not only smart with the knowledge that a black man occupied an office they never will, but have to go back to their redneck districts and explain to their constituencies that after voting on the issue 60 times they could not even defeat a black man who is no longer in office.

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    1. Good point. likely applies to troll #2

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  14. More on Nunes: http://addictinginfo.org/2017/03/22/bombshell-devin-nunes-entire-net-worth-sunk-in-company-with-strong-ties-to-russia/

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    1. How many Republicans does Putin own?

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    2. Just the important ones. The rest tag along at no cost.

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    3. How many French politicians does he own?

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    4. Marine LePen to start. Donald Trump in a skirt.

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  15. Rumor has it Flynn is cutting a deal with the FBI.

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    1. Nunes is scared, and Schiff knows why.

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    2. CNN is reporting Flynn may have flipped on Trump and Nunes. Things getting wild.

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  16. CNN reported in a Wall Street Journal story last night: former Security Advisor (Woollsey) to Trump Campaign and transition team (he was also affiliated with Flynn's consultng company) says he attended a meeting in Sept 2016 where Flynn and some trkish officials MAY have been discussing Flynn being able to deliver a US green card holder and enemy of Erdogan (President of turkey) (US legal resident) to the turks outside of the extradition process (which sound like Kidnapping doesn't it?). Woollsey and a reporter for the Wall Street Journal were interviewed last night.

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  17. 11:03am. Residual racism? Is that because President Obama (mixed race) was voted into office twice? Or because President President Clinton claimed to be the first "Black President "? Or are you trying to claim that "you"are not a racist because "you" voted for him? You, come across pretty desperate with your emphasis on a person's skin tone, quite often on this blog.
    Are "you" harboring Anglo guilt?

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    1. Sorry to have to explain the obvious, but he wasn't voted in by the racists.

      Every time someone like you feels the need to describe Obama as "mixed race" domonstrates that the qualifier "residual" is often misplaced.

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    2. This is troll #1. Always trying to project fake shades of bigotry on others to deaden their argument

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    3. 2:49pm and 3:13pm. From "your" response "you" both have Mommy issues.
      In the very least, President Husain Obama respected his mom who was Anglo.

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    4. Rock n roll!
      Trump n troll!
      Still got Obama on his brain.
      Still can't spell 'hussein'.

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    5. Ah, 4:48. An ad hominem attack followed by a standard bigoted misuse of President Obama's middle name.

      Is that all you've got? You must be the debate champion of your klavern.

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  18. Trolls get trumped again!

    Trump Heads To Golf Club For the Twelfth Time In 9-Week Presidency. This is putting a hole in another one of his campaign promises.

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  19. When the next attack on us soil happens you can blame trump:

    The U.S. military acknowledged for the first time Saturday that it launched an airstrike against the Islamic State in the densely packed Iraqi city of Mosul, where residents say more than 100 people were killed in a single event.

    If confirmed, the March 17 incident would mark the greatest loss of civilian life since the United States began strikes on Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria in 2014.

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  20. The noose is tightening: http://www.salon.com/2017/03/24/5-key-questions-about-the-fbis-trump-russia-investigation_partner/

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  21. Obama represented me: my mother was a white midwestern woman, too. I know that the apoplectic Republicans could not believe that they did not have the political power to keep that black guy from being elected, much less reelected. Wish we had the class, intelligence and education that the Obama family represented back. But wishing will not make it so. What we get to do now is watch this poorly prepared (how do you get a degree in Economics from Whaton School of Business if you cannot read and cannot string together a complete, well punctuated sentence?) drag the reputation of the United States down. How embarrassing!

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    1. Trump not dumb - he talks they way to appeal to voters. George bush 2 did the same. Even oventec a Texas accent (he's from New England). But trump is a narcissist which causes him to act in stupid ways

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    2. Getting in an Ivy is the hard part for non-legacy or non-wealthy. Getting a degree is not. Ever hear of Gentleman's C's?

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    3. That's how bush performed
      Totally mediocre fool

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  22. Trump's impeachment will be much better attended than his inauguration.

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