Saturday, April 15, 2017

The Vaskenator: News related to the Pasadena Police Lieutenant Vasken Gourdikian case finally emerges

 The Vaskenator
As many Tattler readers will recall, the Sierra Madre home of Pasadena Police Lieutenant Vasken Gourdikian was raided by the Feds last February, and crates of what are suspected of being high powered and quite illegal weaponry were seized and carted away as evidence of criminal wrongdoing. The boldest original reporting on this event came from the Pasadena Weekly, who limned the goings on this way (link):

A Pasadena police officer has been placed on administrative leave pending an internal investigation after agents with the US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) searched his home last Thursday. Property records obtained by the Pasadena Weekly list Lt. Vasken Gourdikian as the owner of the Sierra Madre home that was searched. A source close to the investigation who asked for anonymity confirmed Gourdikian is the officer in question. 

According to CBS Channel 2 News, the officer’s Sierra Madre home was raided as part of a criminal investigation. Reporters said they saw numerous gun cases in the garage which was opened when ATF agents arrived. The door was closed almost instantly and dozens of the cases were loaded into an SUV and a van. “There were so many it took two vehicles to haul them away,” stated CBS reporter Jeff Nguyen.

Now if you or I were the subject of such a colorful investigation we'd probably find ourselves uneasily resting in jail today, and the subject of a lot of uncomfortable media attention. However, this story almost immediately disappeared from all local news sources. And even then nearly all of what coverage did emerge initially dared not even mention The Vaskenator's name.

Why is that? Because under California state law police officers enjoy extraordinary legal privileges and protections, even when they are busted by Federal agents for allegedly stashing an arsenal of illegal weaponry in their garage.

That "thin blue line" hype you've heard so much about recently apparently exists behind a legal shield so daunting it turns even the most intrepid news reporters into something quite timid and runny.

After nearly two months of no coverage, this story has now come roaring back to life. In an article that appeared yesterday on the news powerhouse Pasadena Now website, intrepid crime reporter Eddie Rivera cracked open the following information (link):


There is a lot more to Eddie's excellent story, and you can check it all out by hitting the link I supplied above. However, and outside of fact that this story also only identified the city of residence and not the name of our alleged gun happy flatfoot, here is the part I found the most annoying:


Like I said, if it was you or I that was busted for such a thing we'd likely be sweating it out in sunny Guantanamo by now dressed up in an orange jumpsuit. But a police officer? The silence becomes deafening. This gent is still even collecting his quite handsome Pasadena paycheck (link).

The Modesto Bee printed an article a while back that describes the extraordinary protections police officers enjoy in this state. Check this out if you're up to it (link):


More news on this story will appear on The Tattler if and when it ever becomes available.

sierramadretattler.blogspot.com

56 comments:

  1. There are many stories in the big cities that never get told. Just like in your little City of Sierra Madre maybe you haven't heard of any officers being fired. You have heard about the officer who shot a man in the back and is still on the SMPD, Have you heard of others over the years? Maybe the lady who was being followed a lot "stalked" by an officer who is no longer on the department might see this and come forward with her story to share here? Situations happen everywhere but when a problem arises in some gangs, organizations and governments the details are kept to a minimum to protect the incident and the image.

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    1. still blows me away that Officer Amos freaked out and shot an unarmed man in the back and all he got was a suspension and brought back to the force and promoted

      that dude should not be a police officer nor ever have a weapon in his possession

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  2. In the Pasadena Weekly article it says the warrant would be unsealed in 10 days .hat was in February? Whatever happened there?

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  3. "Now This Song Is Dedicated
    To A Special Kind Of Person
    The Kind Of Person That's Hiding
    Under Rocks And In Closets
    Wherever You Go
    Hiding
    Behind A Guise Of Respectability
    The Cowardly Journalist
    Who Hides Behind His Typewriter
    Exploiting People Who Can't Fight Back
    The Assassin
    Who Strikes People By Surprise
    The Sickie Sadist
    Who Hides Behind His Police Badge
    To Commit Crimes Of Violence
    Against Other People
    Whatever Role They Are Playing
    These Creeps
    Are Always The Same
    Because
    A Pig Is A Pig
    And That's That"

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    1. Did you make this up all by yourself?

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    2. It's a song from the punk rock band The Plasmatics. Released in 1981 on their album "Beyond the Valley of 1984."

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  4. Sympathy for the DevilApril 15, 2017 at 8:28 AM

    "When all the cops are criminals and the sinners saints some people call me Lucifer. I'm in need of some restraint ..."

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    Replies
    1. Are we playing Name That Tune today?
      Plasmatics are way cooler than the Stones.........

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  5. Gourdikian is paid over a quarter million dollars a year. $2.5 million a decade. He was busted by ATF for illegal arms trafficking. Yet he enjoys protections you and I can only dream of. Why? What makes him so valuable to society?

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  6. 8:19am. Your the purvey closeted 5am, canyon porno guy!

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    Replies
    1. No Sorry wrong guy I do not live in the "Canyon" and I do not purvey anything from a closet?

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    2. Where do you store your paprika?

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  7. I can walk into a Pot shop, and buy whatever I want.
    I should have the same right to walk into a guys garage and buy firearms.

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    Replies
    1. Great. A guy who likes to get high and shoot his AK47.

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    2. Hey, I thought pot meant peace, man.

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    3. Both businesses require proper vetting and a license to sell their product. Get a permit I see no problem with either.

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    4. Apparently Gourdikian did not have a license to sell semi-automatic weapons out of his garage.

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    5. A semi-automatic rifle and a bag of weed. Welcome to the new American dream.

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    6. The Chamber of Commerce is thinking of replacing the Wistaria Festival with Guns and Ganja Night.

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    7. I hope they know enough to hire a reggae band.

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  8. Cop unions bribed the state legislature, and their reward is a censored news media. Public employee unions are destroying California.

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  9. This is why boring, middle aged ,decent citizens despise Police. What happened to equal protection under the law ? Once those with a badge and a gun(s) are not held accountable, respect for Law Enforcement is lost - even among their most supportive demographic.
    It starts with little things like shooting innocent civilians in the back in Sierra Madre and receiving no consequences.

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  10. Don't forget the police murderers @ Tailgators bar in Sierra Madre 2002. That was clearly a murder by Cop also. They got away with it......

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    Replies
    1. Fatal Bar Shooting Shatters Peace in Tiny Sierra Madre
      http://articles.latimes.com/2002/aug/23/local/me-sierra23

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    2. Not according to the facts described in the article 10:51.

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    3. 10:51, you are the worst kind of moron. You push forward an opinion utterly lacking in facts. You jump on a bandwagon of "killer cops" and have the nerve to call it murder. The man killed in the confrontation was pointing a gun at the owner and an off duty police officer. That is self defense. As a member of society you are not expected to accept the role of victim if can defend yourself. You should be ashamed of yourself and owe an apology to the man you accused of murder.

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    4. Exactly what I would expect from you.

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    5. Do you know what the definition of useless activity is? Worrying about what you think.

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    6. Wrong! It's writing things you can't substantiate, then trying to deflect. That's a useless activity. Nice try though.

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    7. 4:36 called you an idiot. You have now proven that right.

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    8. 3:40, look into the true story, stop being a mindless sheep. Your post is meaningless...as I Imagine you are.

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    9. Is the Los Angeles Times story correct? You keep alluding to a "true story," yet you never share it. Why are you afraid to talk about it?
      http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-firearms-sales-20170415-story.html

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    10. Where on earth do you get the idea or implication that I am "afraid" to talk about this. Do your own research. You can look at the times or any other news source that covered the story. The date was August 23, 2002. One man points a gun at another after a confrontation in the bar. The second man (off-duty police officer) shoots and kills him.

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    11. That simple, eh?

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    12. MAYBE I SHOULD TYPE MORE SLOWLY...A
      MAN POINTS A GUN AT YOU, WHAT WOULD YOU DO?

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    13. I'd invite the gunman out for a taco. Everybody loves tacos.

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    14. It's true, everyone loves tacos! But remember:
      "You can get much farther with a kind word and a gun than you can with a kind word alone."

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  11. I so love the fact that every story has at least 2 sides. For our safety, for the better good of all and other sayings that mean the same thing, we don't know all the facts. Without knowing all the truths how can you judge? It's a tough world we live in.

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    Replies
    1. It is true. By unfairly keeping police salaries in the mid $200,000 range PPD officers are forced by Pasadena to look for alternative means to make ends meet.

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  12. 11.50... Can we expand on your comment. The majority of all US taxpayers earn less than $200k, there for the majority of us must be thieves?

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    Replies
    1. No. You missed the sarcastic intent of the post. See if you can't get someone to read it to you.

      Delete
  13. 11:50pm. Guns for hire?
    Are you supporting the MS-13 gangs from El Salvador? Or the NorthWest homies from Pasadena, maybe the Crips and Bloods?
    Are you saying moonlighting as gan'sters could be the PD's second calling?
    They would make way more money then they do protecting your @$$.

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    Replies
    1. Then they should quit and do work they're obviously more suited for.

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  14. 11:50, good one, that is funny. The reason public employs are paid a good salary is so they try to do a good job. Unfortunately that is not always the case. There can be more that one bad apple in the barrow.

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    1. Public employees is to get paid to match the private sector. But the private sector wage base has collapsed with the unions so now it looks like public sector people are royalty. Meanwhile executive compensation is off the charts. Yet the unions still get blamed.

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    2. In this case the pay is from the taxpayers. Sure many executives get paid more than they are worth, but that revenue is privately generated. That is the difference.

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    3. The revenue to private corporations, 7:21, frequently comes from government spending (i.e. taxpayer dollars) and the ginormous salaries and benefits private executives receive are always deducted from corporate revenues when calculating taxes (i.e. subsidized by the taxpayers).

      There is no such thing as truly private enterprise or unsubsidized capitalism.

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    4. Sure. But Pasadena spent itself into $1.5 billion in CalPERS debt. That took some serious stupid.

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    5. Perhaps, but what would those services (regardless whether you think they were needed) have cost the taxpayers if they had been put out for "bid," with politically connected corporations getting the contracts, paying low wages to workers (who thus have less to spend at local businesses), experiencing "unforeseen" cost overruns that of course are picked up by the taxpayers not the politically connected corporations who bear little risk, and profits flowing out of the area to places such as Wall St.

      At least local government employees tend to live locally and spend their wages locally. (Please don't distract with "X number of SM employees live out of town" unless you state how many Arcadia, Monrovia, Pasadena, and other nearby cities' employees live in SM. It tends to even out; people have to live somewhere after all.)

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    6. Sheriffs are cheaper.

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  15. Yah, but just think of all the rotten apples under the tree, more than just one bad apple in the barrow.
    Who else will clean up that rot? Don't find that many citizens willing to step up.

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  16. 2:56pm. Fine for you, sitting back in your rocking chair, making quick swipes with your EBT card, when you are allowed out in society.

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  17. We will never know what will happen...it will just disappear...it's the Pasadena Way...

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    Replies
    1. Got to keep the taxpayers thinking everything is just swell.

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